Temperature Measurements in the Laser-Heated Diamond Cell

  1. Murli H. Manghnani and
  2. Yasuhiko Syono
  1. Dion L. Heinz and
  2. Raymond Jeanloz

Published Online: 21 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM039p0113

High-Pressure Research in Mineral Physics: A Volume in Honor of Syun-iti Akimoto

High-Pressure Research in Mineral Physics: A Volume in Honor of Syun-iti Akimoto

How to Cite

Heinz, D. L. and Jeanloz, R. (2013) Temperature Measurements in the Laser-Heated Diamond Cell, in High-Pressure Research in Mineral Physics: A Volume in Honor of Syun-iti Akimoto (eds M. H. Manghnani and Y. Syono), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM039p0113

Author Information

  1. Department of Geology, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 21 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1987

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875900667

Online ISBN: 9781118664124

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Keywords:

  • Mineralogy and Crystal Chemistry;
  • Phase transformations;
  • High Pressure-High Temperature Research

Summary

A spectroradiometer has been developed to measure peak temperatures (1500–6000 K) and temperature gradients of laser-heated samples contained at high pressures in the diamond cell. It is necessary to measure temperature gradients because the high thermal conductivity of diamond results in large thermal gradients in the sample. A narrow sampling slit is scanned across the image of the radially symmetric heated spot. This gives a set of line integrals across the distribution of emitted thermal radiation, which can be inverted by an Abel transformation to obtain the radial intensity distribution. Collection and inversion of line integrals at two or more wavelengths allow the radial temperature distribution to be determined. The effect of using a finite-width sampling slit is to slightly bias the high spatial-frequency components of the temperature distribution. If the temperature distribution is spherically symmetric a second Abel transformation directly yields the three dimensional temperature distribution. Deviations from spherical symmetry (horizontal:vertical dimensions up to 2:1) can be corrected for, and larger deviations reduce the three-dimensional distribution to a two-dimensional problem.