A Review of the Problems Important for Interpretation Of The Cambro-Ordovician Paleogeography Of Northern Victoria Land (Antarctica), Tasmania, and New Zealand

  1. Garry D. Mckenzie
  1. R. H. Findlay

Published Online: 21 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM040p0049

Gondwana Six: Structure, Tectonics, and Geophysics

Gondwana Six: Structure, Tectonics, and Geophysics

How to Cite

Findlay, R. H. (1987) A Review of the Problems Important for Interpretation Of The Cambro-Ordovician Paleogeography Of Northern Victoria Land (Antarctica), Tasmania, and New Zealand, in Gondwana Six: Structure, Tectonics, and Geophysics (ed G. D. Mckenzie), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM040p0049

Author Information

  1. Department of Geology, University Of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia 7001

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 21 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1987

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875900643

Online ISBN: 9781118664483

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Keywords:

  • Gondwana(Geology)—Congresses;
  • Geology,Structural—Congresses

Summary

The Cambrian to Ordovician tectonics of northern Victoria Land may be explained in terms of a plate tectonic collision involving three terranes: the western foreland Wilson Terrane, the central island arc Bowers Terrane, and the eastern turbidite fan sequence of the Robertson Bay Terrane. The Cambro-Ordovician tectonics of Tasmania differ in that they were dominated by rifting, closure of rifts, and uplift. Likewise, although lithologies in the two regions are superficially comparable, the important units in either one of the regions cannot be identified in the other. New Zealand poses special problems. It contains Cambro-Ordovician sequences comparable to those in northern Victoria Land and Ordovician-Devonian sequences similar to those in Tasmania. New Zealand's Cambro-Ordovican tectonics resemble those of Tasmania, whereas New Zealand' Siluro-Devonian tectonics share close affinities with those of both Tasmania and northern Victoria Land. It is concluded that the three regions formed part of a tectonically linked system of Cambrian island arcs and rifted microcontinents which, in Late Cambrian and Early Ordovician times, collided with the then eastern margin of Gondwana (eastern Antarctica-South Australia). A subsequent Siluro-Devonian orogeny occurred along this newly accreted eastern margin of Gondwana. The newly reported west over east thrusting in northern Victoria Land could well have occurred during this event, rather than in Early Ordovican times.