A New Theropod Dinosaur from India with Remarks on the Gondwana-Laurasia Connection in the Late Triassic

  1. Garry D. McKenzie
  1. S. Chatterjee

Published Online: 18 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM041p0183

Gondwana Six: Stratigraphy, Sedimentology, and Paleontology

Gondwana Six: Stratigraphy, Sedimentology, and Paleontology

How to Cite

Chatterjee, S. (1987) A New Theropod Dinosaur from India with Remarks on the Gondwana-Laurasia Connection in the Late Triassic, in Gondwana Six: Stratigraphy, Sedimentology, and Paleontology (ed G. D. McKenzie), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM041p0183

Author Information

  1. The Museum, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 18 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1987

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875900674

Online ISBN: 9781118664254

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Keywords:

  • Gondwana (Geology)—Congresses;
  • Sedimentology—Congresses;
  • Paleontology—Congresses

Summary

Walkeria maleriensis (n. g., n. sp.) from the Late Triassic Maleri Formation of the Godavari Valley of India is the earliest known dinosaur from Asia. It is a small podokesaurid theropod, very similar to Procompsognathus of Germany, Coelophysis of North America, and Syntarsus from Zimbabwe and North America. The podokesaurs are of particular interest to students of organic evolution because they are the earliest known theropods from which Archaeopteryx, the oldest known fossil bird, was probably evolved. Traditionally, India has been regarded as a part of Gondwana. It is generally believed that Gondwana remained an integral geographic unit throughout the Triassic. If this is so, a strong faunal correlation between India and other Gondwana continents should be expected in Late Triassic time. Contrary to this, the Maleri fauna is overwhelmingly “northern”. Walkeria occurs in association with metoposaurs, parasuchids, protorosaurs, aetosaurs, rhynchosaurs, and traversodonts. Most of these taxa have been identified in the Dockum fauna of North America, indicating a close paleontologic link between India and Laurasia. Possibly the route of faunal migration between India and North America during the Late Triassic was via northern Africa.