Relationship of Eustatic Oscillations to Regressions and Transgressions on Passive Continental Margins

  1. Raymond A. Price
  1. Charles L. Angevine

Published Online: 18 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM048p0029

Origin and Evolution of Sedimentary Basins and Their Energy and Mineral Resources

Origin and Evolution of Sedimentary Basins and Their Energy and Mineral Resources

How to Cite

Angevine, C. L. (1989) Relationship of Eustatic Oscillations to Regressions and Transgressions on Passive Continental Margins, in Origin and Evolution of Sedimentary Basins and Their Energy and Mineral Resources (ed R. A. Price), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM048p0029

Author Information

  1. Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming 82071

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 18 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1989

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875904528

Online ISBN: 9781118666654

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Keywords:

  • Sedimentary basins—Congresses;
  • Mines and mineral resources—Congresses;
  • Power resources—Congresses

Summary

Third-order (1–10 my) sea-level oscillations may cause cycles of transgression and regression on passive continental margins. However. transgressions need not be synchronous with highstands nor regressions with lowstands. Theoretical modelling shows that a natural time lag exists between a harmonic eustatic fluctuation and the resultant shoreline oscillation. The magnitude of the time lag will range from zero up to one-fourth the period of the eustatic cycle, depending on the passive margin's geometry and subsidence rate. Because the time lag can vary from one margin to another. there is no reason to expect regression-related unconformities to be globally synchronous. The amplitude of the shoreline oscillation depends not only on the amplitude of the sea level change, but also on the time lag. Transgressions and regressions are most extensive when the time lag is small. Application of the model to the Oligocene section of the U.S. Atlantic margin indicates that a major mid-Oligocene regression may have coincided with a glacioeustatic lowstand