Deep Crustal Structural Controls on Sedimentary Basin Geometry

  1. Raymond A. Price
  1. D. J. Blundell,
  2. T. J. Reston and
  3. A. M. Stein

Published Online: 18 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM048p0057

Origin and Evolution of Sedimentary Basins and Their Energy and Mineral Resources

Origin and Evolution of Sedimentary Basins and Their Energy and Mineral Resources

How to Cite

Blundell, D. J., Reston, T. J. and Stein, A. M. (1989) Deep Crustal Structural Controls on Sedimentary Basin Geometry, in Origin and Evolution of Sedimentary Basins and Their Energy and Mineral Resources (ed R. A. Price), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM048p0057

Author Information

  1. Department of Geology, Royal Holloway and Bedford New College, University of London, England

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 18 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1989

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875904528

Online ISBN: 9781118666654

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Keywords:

  • Sedimentary basins—Congresses;
  • Mines and mineral resources—Congresses;
  • Power resources—Congresses

Summary

Deep seismic reflection surveys around Britain have shown deep seated faults bounding sedimentary basins. The geometry of these faults has influenced the internal structure and stratigraphic evolution of the basins. The faults are commonly derived from older structures partially reactivated during basin development. At depth, seismic reflections from these bounding faults merge into a lower crustal reflective zone. Modeling the seismic reflection character of the mid to lower crust suggests that lower crustal extension relating to basin development develops along anastomosing shear zones through the lower crust. This geometry can be viewed in simple terms to give basin development resulting from simple shear along individual faults in the upper crust above a region of bulk pure shear in the lower crust which can extend beyond the confines of the basin, possibly leading to the development of secondary shears in mid-crust at their periphery. variations in the relative amounts of extension in upper and lower crust, together with fault geometry, can give rise to a variety of basin geometries and styles.