A Low-Temperature Hydrothermal Maturation Mechanism for Sedimentary Basins Associated With Volcanic Rocks

  1. Raymond A. Price
  1. Neil S. Summer1 and
  2. Kenneth L. Verosub2

Published Online: 18 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM048p0129

Origin and Evolution of Sedimentary Basins and Their Energy and Mineral Resources

Origin and Evolution of Sedimentary Basins and Their Energy and Mineral Resources

How to Cite

Summer, N. S. and Verosub, K. L. (1989) A Low-Temperature Hydrothermal Maturation Mechanism for Sedimentary Basins Associated With Volcanic Rocks, in Origin and Evolution of Sedimentary Basins and Their Energy and Mineral Resources (ed R. A. Price), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM048p0129

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Geology, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904, Israel

  2. 2

    Department of Geology, University of California, Davis, California 95616

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 18 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1989

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875904528

Online ISBN: 9781118666654

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Keywords:

  • Sedimentary basins—Congresses;
  • Mines and mineral resources—Congresses;
  • Power resources—Congresses

Summary

Data from sediments associated with volcanic rocks around the world demonstrate that a generally unrecognized maturation mechanism is operating in certain geologically active areas. This mechanism is hydrothermal in nature and involves the transport of heat away from intrusive bodies or deep penetrating faults by laterally-flowing aquifers. The mechanism accounts for regional maturation and diagenetic effects which cannot be explained by conductive heat transfer. In many cases economically important hydrocarbon accumulations can be associated with volcanism via a hydrothermal maturation model, wherein thermal fluids playa major role in the maturation of source rocks and assist in migration of the evolved hydrocarbons. Applying the model would not only give new insights into the thermal history of basin sediments but may assist in determining areas of highest exploration potential. Overall, volcanism has played a larger role in the thermal maturation of certain sedimentary basins than has previously been assumed.