Neogene-Quaternary Pannonian Basin: A Structure of Labigenic Type

  1. Raymond A. Price
  1. V. G. Nikolaev1,
  2. D. Vass2 and
  3. D. Pogacsas3

Published Online: 18 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM048p0187

Origin and Evolution of Sedimentary Basins and Their Energy and Mineral Resources

Origin and Evolution of Sedimentary Basins and Their Energy and Mineral Resources

How to Cite

Nikolaev, V. G., Vass, D. and Pogacsas, D. (1989) Neogene-Quaternary Pannonian Basin: A Structure of Labigenic Type, in Origin and Evolution of Sedimentary Basins and Their Energy and Mineral Resources (ed R. A. Price), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM048p0187

Author Information

  1. 1

    Geological Institute of the USSR Academy of Sciences, USSR

  2. 2

    Shtur Geological Institute of Bratislava, Czechoslovakia

  3. 3

    Geophysical Exploration Company, Budapest, Hungary

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 18 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1989

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875904528

Online ISBN: 9781118666654

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Keywords:

  • Sedimentary basins—Congresses;
  • Mines and mineral resources—Congresses;
  • Power resources—Congresses

Summary

The Neogene-Quaternary sedimentary cover of the Pannonian Basin is subdivided into two structural complexes, the lower of Miocene age, and the upper one of Upper Miocene, Pliocene and Quaternary age. The lower complex shows typical narrow, extended structures, with synchronously developed linear zones of andesitic and rhyolitic volcanics. The upper complex shows gently sloping, irregularly shaped structures whose formation was accompanied by widespread basaltic volcanism. The thickest successions of the lower complex are associated with the basin's margins, whereas the thickest succesions of the upper complex are central to the basin. Miocene strata (up to the Sarmatian) were formed under conditions of extension, whereas the upper complex was dominated by vertical negative movements. Structural analysis of the deep-seated part of the earth's crust beneath the basin suggests that basin formation began in Middle Miocene time (main stage - Upper Miocene/Pliocene) due to the emplacement of a mantle diapir. The Pannonian basin, as well as basins of the internal Mediterranean belt seas, falls into a specific new class of structures herein identified as labigenic structures