The Glimpce Seismic Experiment: Onshore Refraction and Wide-Angle Reflection Observations from a Fan Line Over the Lake Superior Midcontinent Rift System

  1. Robert F. Mereu,
  2. Stephan Mueller and
  3. David M. Fountain
  1. Duryodhan Epili and
  2. Robert F. Mereu

Published Online: 9 APR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM051p0093

Properties and Processes of Earth's Lower Crust

Properties and Processes of Earth's Lower Crust

How to Cite

Epili, D. and Mereu, R. F. (2013) The Glimpce Seismic Experiment: Onshore Refraction and Wide-Angle Reflection Observations from a Fan Line Over the Lake Superior Midcontinent Rift System, in Properties and Processes of Earth's Lower Crust (eds R. F. Mereu, S. Mueller and D. M. Fountain), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM051p0093

Author Information

  1. Department of Geophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada N6a 5B7

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 9 APR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1989

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875904566

Online ISBN: 9781118666388

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Keywords:

  • Earth—Crust—Congresses;
  • Geophysics—Congresses

Summary

The 1986 GLIMPCE experiment (Great Lakes International Multidisciplinary Program for Crustal Evolution) was a combined on-ship seismic reflection and onshore seismic refraction experiment designed to determine the structure of the crust beneath the Great Lakes. the main tectonic targets of interest were the Midcontinent Rift System, the Grenville Front, the Penokean and Huronian Fold Belts and the Michipicoten Greenstone Belt. the source of the seismic energy came from a large air gun array fired at closely spaced intervals (50–350 m) over several long lines (150–350 km) crossing the lakes. Major participants of this experiment were the Geological Survey of Canada, the United States Geological Survey and a number of universities and research institutes on both sides of the border. the University of Western Ontario (UWO) collected data at five separate land stations using portable seismic refraction instruments.

In this paper we present the results of a fan profile which was recorded from a UWO station on Michipicoten Island for the N-S line A which crossed the axis of the Lake Superior Synclinal Basin. the azimuth and distance ranges for this profile were 237 to 321 degrees and 120 to 170 km respectively. Detailed observations of the record sections show that p. is not a simple arrival but forms a rather complex pattern of irregular multiple arrivals. the wide-angle PmP reflection signals from the Moho are strong and well obilerved only for the shots fired near the ends of the line. the signals from the middle of the profile arrive relatively late and form very weak complex wave trains. These results indicate that the Moho in that area is probably greatly disrupted and gives added support to the rift theory for the structure under the lake. the observations also support the results of earlier crustal studies of Lake Superior which showed that the crust under the eastern part of the lake was exceedingly thick.