Gravity Field, Deep Seismic Sounding and Nature of Continental Crust Underneath NW Himalayas

  1. Robert F. Mereu,
  2. Stephan Mueller and
  3. David M. Fountain
  1. R. K. Verma and
  2. K. A. V. L. Prasad

Published Online: 9 APR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM051p0279

Properties and Processes of Earth's Lower Crust

Properties and Processes of Earth's Lower Crust

How to Cite

Verma, R. K. and Prasad, K. A. V. L. (1989) Gravity Field, Deep Seismic Sounding and Nature of Continental Crust Underneath NW Himalayas, in Properties and Processes of Earth's Lower Crust (eds R. F. Mereu, S. Mueller and D. M. Fountain), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM051p0279

Author Information

  1. Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad, India

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 9 APR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1989

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875904566

Online ISBN: 9781118666388

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Keywords:

  • Earth—Crust—Congresses;
  • Geophysics—Congresses

Summary

A large number of earth scientists believe that the Himalayas have evolved as a result of collision of the Indian and Eurasian plates, sometime during cretaceous to Eocene times [Gansser, 1964, 1977; Dewey and Bird, 1973; Powell and Conaghan, 1973]. As a result of the collision, an estimated crustal shortening of the order of at least 300 Km took place apparently through movements along major Himalayan thrusts, such as the Main Central Thrust (MCT), the Main Boundary Thrust (MBT) and several others. These movements have resulted in thickening of the crust to 65–75 Km as shown by Gupta and Narain [1967], Kaila et al. [1982, 1984]. A vital question concerning the Himalayas is how the crustal thickening has taken place.