A Lacustrine Record of Late Holocene Climate Change from South-Central Alaska

  1. David H. Peterson
  1. Richard M. Forester1,
  2. L. Denis Delorme2 and
  3. Thomas A. Ager3

Published Online: 23 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM055p0033

Aspects of Climate Variability in the Pacific and the Western Americas

Aspects of Climate Variability in the Pacific and the Western Americas

How to Cite

Forester, R. M., Delorme, L. D. and Ager, T. A. (1989) A Lacustrine Record of Late Holocene Climate Change from South-Central Alaska, in Aspects of Climate Variability in the Pacific and the Western Americas (ed D. H. Peterson), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM055p0033

Author Information

  1. 1

    U-S. Geological Survey, Ms-919Denver, Co 80225

  2. 2

    Nwrip.O. Box 5050, Burlington, On, Canada L7r4al

  3. 3

    U.S. Geological Surveyms-908, Reston, Va 22092

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 23 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1989

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875900728

Online ISBN: 9781118664285

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Keywords:

  • Climatic changes—Pacific Area.;
  • Paleoclimatology—Pacific Area.;
  • Climatic changes—West (U.S.);
  • Paleoclimatology—West (U.S.);
  • Atmospheric carbon dioxide.

Summary

Study of ostracodes and pollen from a late Holocene core taken from Kepler Lake, Alaska, indicates that local vegetation underwent little change, whereas the ostracode fauna forms three distinctive assemblages spanning the past 2700 years. The variability in the ostracode fauna implies that limnologic and climatic changes occurred during the late Holocene, but were not of sufficient scale to be seen in the pollen record. The interpretation of the late Holocene climate history, based on the ostracode record, suggests a warmer and perhaps seasonally drier period than modern climate (243 to 70 cm), a colder and probably drier period than modern climate (67 cm to near core top), and the modern climate. These ostracode intervals may correspond to pre-Little Ice Age, Little Ice Age, and the modern climates.