Siliceous Phytoplankton Flux: Interannual Variability and Response to Hydrographic Changes in the Northeastern Pacific

  1. David H. Peterson
  1. Kozo Takahashi1,
  2. Susumu Honjo1 and
  3. Susumu Tabata2

Published Online: 23 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM055p0151

Aspects of Climate Variability in the Pacific and the Western Americas

Aspects of Climate Variability in the Pacific and the Western Americas

How to Cite

Takahashi, K., Honjo, S. and Tabata, S. (1989) Siliceous Phytoplankton Flux: Interannual Variability and Response to Hydrographic Changes in the Northeastern Pacific, in Aspects of Climate Variability in the Pacific and the Western Americas (ed D. H. Peterson), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM055p0151

Author Information

  1. 1

    Woods Hole Oceanographic Institutionwoods Hole, Ma, U.S.A.

  2. 2

    Institute of Ocean Sciencessidney, Bc, Canada

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 23 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1989

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875900728

Online ISBN: 9781118664285

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Keywords:

  • Climatic changes—Pacific Area.;
  • Paleoclimatology—Pacific Area.;
  • Climatic changes—West (U.S.);
  • Paleoclimatology—West (U.S.);
  • Atmospheric carbon dioxide.

Summary

Time-series fluxes of diatoms and silicoflagellates were measured nearly continuously at pelagic Station Papa in the northeastern subarctic Pacific during September 1982 through August 1986. Significantly large interannual flux variability was observed. In 1984 the fluxes were notably low relative to other years: either flux peaks were absent or slightly above the baseline values depending on taxa. Such flux suppression is attributed to changes in upper water hydrography. Within a limited physical oceanography data set a significantly shallower thermocline was observed during April 1984 than other years. This shallow and probable maximum winter mixing of 1984 is interpreted to have resulted in limited convective nutrient supply. Time varying export production of the siliceous phytoplankton, which can be continuously measured as vertical flux, is related with changes in the hydrography and thus the flux is a useful oceanographic proxy for mixed layer conditions.