A Bubblelike Coronal Mass Ejection Flux Rope in the Solar Wind

  1. C. T. Russell,
  2. E. R. Priest and
  3. L. C. Lee
  1. N. U. Crooker1,
  2. J. T. Gosling2,
  3. E. J. Smith3 and
  4. C. T. Russell4

Published Online: 21 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM058p0365

Physics of Magnetic Flux Ropes

Physics of Magnetic Flux Ropes

How to Cite

Crooker, N. U., Gosling, J. T., Smith, E. J. and Russell, C. T. (1990) A Bubblelike Coronal Mass Ejection Flux Rope in the Solar Wind, in Physics of Magnetic Flux Ropes (eds C. T. Russell, E. R. Priest and L. C. Lee), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM058p0365

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90024–1565

  2. 2

    University of California, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545

  3. 3

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109

  4. 4

    Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90024–1567

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 21 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1990

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875900261

Online ISBN: 9781118663868

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Keywords:

  • Solar photosphere;
  • Magnetic flux;
  • Astrophysics

Summary

A resolution to the question of whether coronal mass ejections are loops or bubbles is proposed and applied to the geometrical analysis of a solar wind event detected at 1 AU by ISEE 1 and 3. The discontinuity orientations, the size determined by time of passage, and the magnetic cloud signature are fit into the topology of a flux rope loop distorted by expansion into a thick rope with comparable dimensions in both the ecliptic and meridional planes. The looped rope fills a bubblelike cavity, thus preserving both types of proposed coronal mass ejection geometries.

Other interesting features of the data include an apparent separation by the rope core of bidirectionally streaming protons in the leading section from electrons in the trailing section, possible vortical flow within the magnetic cloud, and a well-defined filamentary structure behind the shock.