Observations of Filamentary Field-Aligned Current Coupling Between the Magnetospheric Boundary Layer and the Ionosphere

  1. C. T. Russell,
  2. E. R. Priest and
  3. L. C. Lee
  1. C. R. Clauer1,
  2. M. A. Mchenry1 and
  3. E. Friis-Christensen2

Published Online: 21 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM058p0565

Physics of Magnetic Flux Ropes

Physics of Magnetic Flux Ropes

How to Cite

Clauer, C. R., Mchenry, M. A. and Friis-Christensen, E. (1990) Observations of Filamentary Field-Aligned Current Coupling Between the Magnetospheric Boundary Layer and the Ionosphere, in Physics of Magnetic Flux Ropes (eds C. T. Russell, E. R. Priest and L. C. Lee), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM058p0565

Author Information

  1. 1

    Star Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, California, 94305

  2. 2

    Division of Geophysics, Danish Meteorological Institute, Lyngbyvej 100 DK-2100, Copenhagen, Denmark

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 21 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1990

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875900261

Online ISBN: 9781118663868

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Keywords:

  • Solar photosphere;
  • Magnetic flux;
  • Astrophysics

Summary

A distinct class of dayside high-latitude magnetic pulsations can be identified from the spatial characteristics of the disturbance field. These pulsations exhibit traveling radial patterns such as would result from moving filaments of field-aligned current interacting with the ionosphere to produce cells of Hall current and vortex-like plasma flow. Time intervals containing a series of continuous multiple vortices are investigated here. We find that the vortices occur on the boundary between sunward and anti-sunward ionospheric plasma convection. Low altitude DMSP satellite particle measurements indicate that the vortices are on magnetic field lines which map to the inner edge of the magnetospheric low latitude boundary layer. No repetitive solar wind disturbance (eg. pressure variations) appears to be associated with the events suggesting that the vortices are related to a local magnetospheric instability. No strong correlation between interplanetary field conditions and the detection of vortices is found, but conditions which slightly favor the detection of vortices are IMF Bx < 0, By > 0, high solar wind density and slow solar wind speed.