Magnetic Flux Ropes in 3-Dimensional MHD Simulations

  1. C. T. Russell,
  2. E. R. Priest and
  3. L. C. Lee
  1. Tatsuki Ogino1,
  2. Raymond J. Walker2 and
  3. Maha Ashour-Abdalla3

Published Online: 21 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM058p0669

Physics of Magnetic Flux Ropes

Physics of Magnetic Flux Ropes

How to Cite

Ogino, T., Walker, R. J. and Ashour-Abdalla, M. (1990) Magnetic Flux Ropes in 3-Dimensional MHD Simulations, in Physics of Magnetic Flux Ropes (eds C. T. Russell, E. R. Priest and L. C. Lee), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM058p0669

Author Information

  1. 1

    Research Institute of Atmospherics, Nagoya University, Toyokawa, Aichi 442, Japan

  2. 2

    Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90024

  3. 3

    Physics Department, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90024

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 21 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1990

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875900261

Online ISBN: 9781118663868

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Keywords:

  • Solar photosphere;
  • Magnetic flux;
  • Astrophysics

Summary

We have used a three-dimensional time dependent global magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the interaction between the solar wind and the Earth's magnetosphere to model the generation of magnetic flux ropes at the magnetopause and in the magnetotail. When the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) has a large azimuthal component (B Y ) as well as a southward component (B Z ), strongly twisted and localized magnetic flux tubes similar to magnetic flux ropes appear at the subsolar magnetopause.

In the magnetotail plasmoids appear after the formation of a near-Earth magnetic neutral line. When the IMF has a finite B Y component there is a large B Y at the center of the plasmoid even in the noon-midnight meridian. The magnetic field lines have a helical structure connected from dawn to dusk. Near the edges of the plasmoid, the field lines which connect with the Earth, are bundled and form a structure similar to magnetic flux ropes along the X-direction near the tail. magnetopause. The magnetic field increases while the plasma pressure decreases inside the flux rope. Eventually the flux rope disconnects from the Earth and propagates down the tail.

When a southward IMF was initially imposed throughout the magnetosphere, patchy magnetic flux ropes immediately appeared in the tail. These flux ropes are smaller than those associated with plasmoids and have a large B Y component at their center.