O+, H+, and He+ Densities from the 200–1600 km Altitude Ionosphere at Arecibo: A Comparison of Theory and Measurement

  1. Gordon R. Wilson
  1. P. G. Richards1,
  2. D. G. Torr2 and
  3. K. L. Miller3

Published Online: 18 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM062p0167

Modeling Magnetospheric Plasma Processes

Modeling Magnetospheric Plasma Processes

How to Cite

Richards, P. G., Torr, D. G. and Miller, K. L. (1991) O+, H+, and He+ Densities from the 200–1600 km Altitude Ionosphere at Arecibo: A Comparison of Theory and Measurement, in Modeling Magnetospheric Plasma Processes (ed G. R. Wilson), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM062p0167

Author Information

  1. 1

    Computer Science Department and Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville

  2. 2

    Physics Department and Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville

  3. 3

    Physics Department and Center for Atmospheric and Space Sciences, Utah State University

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 18 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1991

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875900285

Online ISBN: 9781118663905

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Keywords:

  • Space plasmas—Mathematical models—Congresses;
  • Magnetosphere—Mathematical models—Congresses

Summary

We have compared measured 0+, H+, and He+ densities over the altitude range 200–1600 km at Arecibo on February 10, 1972 with densities calculated by our comprehensive ionosphere-plasmasphere model. There is excellent agreement between measurement and model for all three ions, indicating that the theory of the major ion chemistry appears to be well understood. Comparison was also made between the model and measured electron and ion temperatures. There was good agreement between the model and the data for the ion temperature and at most altitudes for the electron temperature during the daytime. However, in the region of the peak electron density, the measured daytime temperature was much larger than the model temperature. The model electron temperatures did agree very well with the measured temperatures for similar thermospheric conditions in February 1977. At night, the measured electron and ion temperatures were higher than the modeled temperatures, which were close to the neutral temperature, indicating a larger plasmaspheric heat reservoir than predicted by the model.