Interannual Variations in the Stratosphere of the Northern Hemisphere: A Description of Some Probable Influences

  1. G.A. McBean and
  2. M. Hantel
  1. H. Van Loon1 and
  2. K. Labitzke2

Published Online: 18 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM075p0111

Interactions Between Global Climate Subsystems the Legacy of Hann

Interactions Between Global Climate Subsystems the Legacy of Hann

How to Cite

Van Loon, H. and Labitzke, K. (1993) Interannual Variations in the Stratosphere of the Northern Hemisphere: A Description of Some Probable Influences, in Interactions Between Global Climate Subsystems the Legacy of Hann (eds G.A. McBean and M. Hantel), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM075p0111

Author Information

  1. 1

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO

  2. 2

    Meteorologisches Lnstitut, Freie Universität, Berlin, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 18 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1993

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875904665

Online ISBN: 9781118666593

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Keywords:

  • Climatic changes—Congresses;
  • Hydrologic cycle—Congresses;
  • Hann, Julius von 1839–1921

Summary

The longest continuous set of daily analyses of stratospheric constant pressure levels covers 34 years, but the levels are all below 25 km. These analyses are for the Northern Hemisphere and have no equivalent on the Southern Hemisphere. Data from single stations go back another five to eight years. The attempts here to link qualitatively some of the interannual variability in the stratosphere to forcings from outside the stratosphere therefore deal with samples that are not necessarily representative of long periods. In addition to the random interannual variability which is inherent in the atmosphere-ocean system, some of the interannual changes in the stratospheric circulation are associated with the following:

1. The Quasi-Biennial Oscillation in the stratospheric winds above the equator. This oscillation is forced from the troposphere.

2. The Southern Oscillation, which is defined as a seesaw in sea level pressure between the Indian and Pacific Oceans but has widespread effects over the globe.

3. Major volcanic eruptions, of which there were three during the period analyzed.

4. A 10–12 year oscillation which is present in the data of the last 40 years, during which time it was in phase with the 11-year solar cycle.

We shall describe each of the four, but emphasize the 10–12 year oscillation.