In Situ Detection of Ionospheric Cavitons: Experimental Considerations

  1. Robert F. Pfaff,
  2. Joseph.E Borovsky and
  3. David T. Young
  1. P. Rodriguez1,
  2. C. L. Siefring1,
  3. D. G. Haas1,
  4. M. M. Baumback1 and
  5. D. P. McNutt2

Published Online: 18 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/GM102p0073

Measurement Techniques in Space Plasmas:Particles

Measurement Techniques in Space Plasmas:Particles

How to Cite

Rodriguez, P., Siefring, C. L., Haas, D. G., Baumback, M. M. and McNutt, D. P. (1998) In Situ Detection of Ionospheric Cavitons: Experimental Considerations, in Measurement Techniques in Space Plasmas:Particles (eds R. F. Pfaff, Joseph.E. Borovsky and D. T. Young), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/GM102p0073

Author Information

  1. 1

    Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC

  2. 2

    The MacNauchtan Laboratory, Colorado Springs, CO

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 18 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1998

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875900858

Online ISBN: 9781118664384

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Keywords:

  • Space plasmas—Measurement;
  • Plasma diagnostics

Summary

Space plasma wave experiments have been designed to detect ionospheric cavitons driven by large amplitude high frequency (HF) radiowaves. In this report, we discuss the small electric field HF double probes and the downconverter designed for in situ measurements. Small double probes (5.5 and 11 cm in length) are used because of the scale size expected for cavitons in the ionosphere. A downconverting receiver is needed to allow baseband sampling of the detected HF waveform. Both the in-phase and quadrature outputs of the downconverter are acquired to allow separation of the upper and lower sidebands. The wave spectra observed in the ionosphere suggest that in situ measurements can be a significant diagnostic of the effects of large amplitude wave interactions.