Effects of Shore Protection and Dredging Projects on Beach Configuration Unjettied Near Tidal Inlets in New Jersey

  1. David G. Aubrey and
  2. Lee Weishar
  1. Karl F. Nordstrom

Published Online: 23 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/LN029p0440

Hydrodynamics and Sediment Dynamics of Tidal Inlets

Hydrodynamics and Sediment Dynamics of Tidal Inlets

How to Cite

Nordstrom, K. F. (1988) Effects of Shore Protection and Dredging Projects on Beach Configuration Unjettied Near Tidal Inlets in New Jersey, in Hydrodynamics and Sediment Dynamics of Tidal Inlets (eds D. G. Aubrey and L. Weishar), Springer-Verlag, New York. doi: 10.1029/LN029p0440

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 23 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1988

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783540968887

Online ISBN: 9781118669242

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Keywords:

  • Beach nourishment projects;
  • Corson Inlet;
  • Great Egg Inlet;
  • Hereford Inlet;
  • New Jersey shoreline;
  • Shoreline changes;
  • Shore protection and dredging projects;
  • Townsend Inlet

Summary

Analysis of shoreline changes at four unjettied inlets on the developed New Jersey shoreline reveals that shorelines have been less mobile under conditions of development than they were prior to development. Bulkheads reduce the amount of shoreline change by preventing breaches in the barrier islands updrift of inlets and by restricting the amount of shoreline retreat that occurs during natural cycles of erosion and accretion. Groins reduce the rate of transport into downdrift shorelines which dampens the accretion phase of the cycles. Maintenance dredging can suppress the cycles by keeping the ebb channel position from fluctuating as widely as it would under natural conditions. The projection of future shoreline change at these four tidal inlets reflects either unidirectional change or stability at locations that formerly were characterized by cyclic change.