Comparative Analysis of Short Time Increment Urban Precipitation Characteristics

  1. AGU Hydrology Section
  1. A. Ramachandra Rao and
  2. B. T. Chenchayya

Published Online: 19 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/SP004p0090

Precipitation Analysis for Hydrologic Modeling

Precipitation Analysis for Hydrologic Modeling

How to Cite

Ramachandra Rao, A. and Chenchayya, B. T. (1975) Comparative Analysis of Short Time Increment Urban Precipitation Characteristics, in Precipitation Analysis for Hydrologic Modeling (ed AGU Hydrology Section), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/SP004p0090

Author Information

  1. School of Civil Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 19 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1975

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118656037

Online ISBN: 9781118668993

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Keywords:

  • Exponential and gamma distribution;
  • Histograms;
  • Markov-chain model;
  • Probability distributions;
  • Transition rate probability;
  • Weibull distribution

Summary

Some of the preliminary results obtained in a comparative analysis of short time increment rainfall characteristics observed in stations located in different climatic zones are presented in this paper. Such an analysis gives better insight to the characterization of short time increment rainfall processes.

The probability distributions fitted to the storm (wet) durations and durations of dry periods are considered. The probability distributions fitted to the data from Boston, Mass., Tucson, Ariz., St. Johnsbury, Vt., Truro, Nova Scotia, Ely, Nev., and West Lafayette, Ind. are analyzed. The transition rate functions, the transition probabilities, the probabilities of storm age and of storm end states are compared. Secondly, the depth-duration relationships of the precipitation characteristics observed in some of the stations mentioned above are compared.

It is found that some of the characteristics, such as the probability distributions of durations of wet periods in Boston, W. Lafayette, and St. Johnsbury are similar to each other although these stations are located in different climatic zones. In the same vein, the probability distributions of durations of dry periods are found to be close to each other for the data from Tucson, Ely and West Lafayette and Boston. The depth-duration relationships are found to be considerably different for many of these stations.