Mathematical Models for the Simulation of Cyclonic Storm Sequences and Precipitation Fields

  1. AGU Hydrology Section
  1. Jaime Amorocho1 and
  2. Baolin Wu2

Published Online: 19 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/SP004p0210

Precipitation Analysis for Hydrologic Modeling

Precipitation Analysis for Hydrologic Modeling

How to Cite

Amorocho, J. and Wu, B. (1975) Mathematical Models for the Simulation of Cyclonic Storm Sequences and Precipitation Fields, in Precipitation Analysis for Hydrologic Modeling (ed AGU Hydrology Section), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/SP004p0210

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Water Science and Engineering, University of California Davis, California 95616

  2. 2

    Contra Costa County Flood Control District 255 Glacier Drive, Martinez, California 94553

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 19 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1975

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118656037

Online ISBN: 9781118668993

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Keywords:

  • Cyclonic storms;
  • Event sequence simulation;
  • Isohyetal maps;
  • Meso-scale and synoptic elements;
  • National Weather Service;
  • Rain field simulation

Summary

Ground records and radar imagery show that many cyclonic storm systems observed in Northern California have distinct storm band structures and that each band is composed of clusters of short-lived rain cells. Based on this information, two mathematical models have been developed for the simulation of cyclonic storm and precipitation fields.

The first, a storm sequence model, uses the Monte Carlo simulation technique to generate storm sequences from the probability distributions of storm characteristics of historical sequences. The storm characteristics analyzed include time between storms, number of bands within a storm, time between bands, band duration, band depth, and band velocity. The second model, which simulates a spatially distributed precipitation field, uses a randomization process to generate clusters of short-lived and high intensity rain cells within a storm hand. The apparent sizes, life cycles and space distribution of rain cells were determined from the properties of historical data. The two models can be used together, or in a succession, to generate precipitation sequences for any sampling time interval and at any ground location in the path of a storm.

The application of these models in Urban Hydrology studies is discussed.