A Quench Pyroxene-Ilmenite Xenolith from Kimberlite: Implications for Pyroxene-Ilmenite Intergrowths.

  1. F.R. Boyd and
  2. Henry O.A. Meyer
  1. Penelope J. Rawlinson and
  2. J.B.J. Dawson

Published Online: 19 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/SP016p0292

The Mantle Sample: Inclusion in Kimberlites and Other Volcanics

The Mantle Sample: Inclusion in Kimberlites and Other Volcanics

How to Cite

Rawlinson, P. J. and Dawson, J.B.J. (1979) A Quench Pyroxene-Ilmenite Xenolith from Kimberlite: Implications for Pyroxene-Ilmenite Intergrowths., in The Mantle Sample: Inclusion in Kimberlites and Other Volcanics (eds F.R. Boyd and H. O.A. Meyer), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D.C.. doi: 10.1029/SP016p0292

Author Information

  1. Department of Geology, University of St. Andrews, Scotland

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 19 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1979

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875902135

Online ISBN: 9781118664858

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Keywords:

  • Bulk and phase chemistry;
  • Clinopyroxenes;
  • Micas;
  • Pyroxene-ilmenite intergrowths;
  • Rock BD202

Summary

A xenolith from the Weltvreden Mine, South Africa, consists mainly of acicular bronzite, intergrown irregularly with magnesium ilmenite, and rarer large bronzites, pyrope and diopside-ilmenite intergrowths. Three stages of cooling can be recognised in this non-equilibrium assemblage which contains (though on a finer scale) phases typical of the discrete nodule and intergrowth suites found in many kimberlites. Comb-layering and spherulitic texture of bronzite-ilmenite intergrowths indicate quenching of a high-titanium liquid. After crystatlisation of garnet, pyroxene and ilmenite, the residual fluids crystallized serpentine, phlogopite, diopside, ilmenite, perovikite and calcite - an assemblage similar to many kimberlite groundmasses.