The July 29, 1977 Magnetic Storm: Observations and Modeling of Energetic Particles at Synchronous Orbit

  1. C.T. Russell and
  2. David J. Southwood
  1. D.N. Baker1,
  2. T.A. Fritz2 and
  3. B. Wilken3

Published Online: 21 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/SP020p0259

The IMS Source Book: Guide to the International Magnetospheric Study Data Analysis

The IMS Source Book: Guide to the International Magnetospheric Study Data Analysis

How to Cite

Baker, D.N., Fritz, T.A. and Wilken, B. (1982) The July 29, 1977 Magnetic Storm: Observations and Modeling of Energetic Particles at Synchronous Orbit, in The IMS Source Book: Guide to the International Magnetospheric Study Data Analysis (eds C.T. Russell and D. J. Southwood), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D.C.. doi: 10.1029/SP020p0259

Author Information

  1. 1

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545

  2. 2

    Space Environment Laboratory, NOAA, Boulder, CO 80303

  3. 3

    Max-Planck-Institut für Aeronomie, D-3411 Katlenburg-Lindau, F.R.G

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 21 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1982

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875902289

Online ISBN: 9781118664940

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Keywords:

  • Adiabatic model;
  • Drift-echo timing information;
  • Gradient anisotropy information;
  • Phase space density variations;
  • Synchronous orbit

Summary

A brief description of the energetic particle studies carried out by Subgroup 6 of CDAW-2 is presented. Instrumentation onboard six spacecraft at (or near) geostationary orbit was used in the analysis. Timing of particle injection during the last, and largest, substorm on July 29, 1977 (∼ 1200 UT) was investigated, as was the particle phase space density variation associated with this event. Energetic proton gradient anisotropies were also used to examine large-scale magnetospheric boundary motions. Finally, adiabatic modeling calculations were performed for the substorm event period, including effects of injection, convection, corotation, and particle drifts. We find substantial evidence to suggest storage of solar wind-derived energy in the magnetotail prior to the substorm and we find this stored energy to be suddenly released at substorm expansion onset. We also find particles at geostationary orbit to be newly accelerated during the substorm to energies ≳ 1 MeV (μ ≳ 100 MeV/G) and modeling shows that these particles could have been convected (and injected) from beyond 10 RE in the nightside magnetosphere.