The Use of Ultrasonic Measurements Under Modest Compression to Estimate Compression at High Pressure

  1. Thomas J. Shankland and
  2. Jay D. Bass
  1. Orson L. Anderson

Published Online: 21 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1029/SP026p0134

Elastic Properties and Equations of State

Elastic Properties and Equations of State

How to Cite

Anderson, O. L. (1988) The Use of Ultrasonic Measurements Under Modest Compression to Estimate Compression at High Pressure, in Elastic Properties and Equations of State (eds T. J. Shankland and J. D. Bass), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1029/SP026p0134

Author Information

  1. Bell Telephone Laboratories, Incorporated, Murray Hill, New Jersey

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 21 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1988

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875902401

Online ISBN: 9781118664971

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Keywords:

  • Adiabatic-isothermal transformations;
  • Logarithmic compression equation;
  • Polynomial compression equation;
  • Pressure;
  • Thermal expansivity data;
  • Ultrasonic measurements

Summary

The variation of sound velocities with pressure can be measured by ultrasonic techniques with great precision, but the pressure range is limited. It is shown how such measurements can be used to estimate the volume dependence on pressure, or compression V/V 0, at pressures one or two orders of magnitude higher than the pressure of the velocity measurements.

A formula for the compression is presented which is based upon the assumption that the bulk modulus is linear with pressure. The parameters of this formula are evaluated with acoustic data so that there are no arbitrary constants or ‘curve-fitting'. The compression formula is compared with polynomial approximations to it and with an equation due to Birch. The compression is evaluated for 14 compounds including compressible materials like K, incompressible materials like Al2O3, and hexagonal metals like Cd. The agreement between the formula and experimental compression data is satisfactory to 100 or 200 kbar, and in several cases to over 1000 kbar.