Occupational contact urticaria from diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A epoxy resin

Authors


Prof Lasse Kanerva MD, PhD
Section of Dermatology
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health
Topelinksenkatu 41 aA
FIN-00250 Helsinki
Finland

Abstract

Background: Epoxy resin (ER) is a common cause of occupational allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), but contact urticaria from ER is very rare.

Methods and Results: A plastic-product worker first developed ACD from diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) epoxy resin, and subsequent exposure resulted half a year later in contact urticaria: first with edema of the lips and eyelids, and later an urticarial reaction on the upper chest, with strong swelling of the eyelids and tightness of the throat. The diagnosis was based on a positive skin prick test to his “own” ER compound, a positive prick test reaction to DGEBA, and a positive skin provocation test with the ER compound and DGEBA. The contact urticaria test reaction was strongly aggravated when the allergen was wiped off with an alcohol solution, apparently because the solution enhanced the penetration of the allergen.

Conclusions: Our case is of interest, first, because contact urticaria from ER is very rare, and second, because this is the second report in which a strongly intensified contact urticaria reaction was provoked by an alcohol solution. We suggest that if the contact urticaria provocation test with low-molecular-weight chemicals is negative, a contact urticaria provocation test with alcohol (CUPTA) should be performed.

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