Adhesion of viridans group streptococci to sialic acid-, galactose- and N-acetylgalactosamine-containing receptors

Authors

  • Y. Takahashi,

    1. Oral Infection and Immunity Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda,
      MD 20892, USA
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  • S. Ruhl,

    1. Oral Infection and Immunity Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda,
      MD 20892, USA
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  • J.-W. Yoon,

    1. Oral Infection and Immunity Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda,
      MD 20892, USA
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  • A. L. Sandberg,

    1. Oral Infection and Immunity Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda,
      MD 20892, USA
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  • J. O. Cisar

    1. Oral Infection and Immunity Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda,
      MD 20892, USA
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John O. Cisar, Building 30, Room 532, NIDCR, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda,
MD 20892, USA

Abstract

The binding of 10 viridans group streptococci to sialic acid-, galactose (Gal)- and N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-containing receptors was defined by analysis of the interactions between these bacteria and structurally defined glycoconjugates, host cells and other streptococci. All interactions with sialic acid-containing receptors were Ca2+-independent as they were not affected by ethyleneglycoltetraacetic acid (EGTA), whereas all interactions with Gal- and GalNAc-containing receptors were Ca2+-dependent. Recognition of sialic acid-, Gal- and GalNAc-containing receptors varied widely among the strains examined, in a manner consistent with the association of each of the three lectin-like activities with a different bacterial cell surface component.

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