Food hypersensitivity in two groups of children and young adults with atopic dermatitis evaluated a decade apart

Authors

  • Lisa K. Ellman,

    1. Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Jaffe Food Allergy Institute, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA
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  • Pantipa Chatchatee,

    1. Present address: Division of Allergy & Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand
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  • Scott H. Sicherer,

    1. Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Jaffe Food Allergy Institute, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA
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  • Hugh A. Sampson

    1. Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Jaffe Food Allergy Institute, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA
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Hugh A. Sampson, MD, Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Jaffe Food Allergy Institute, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Box 1198, One Gustave L. Levy Place, New York, NY 10029, USA
Tel.: 212-241-5548
Fax: 212-426-1902
E-mail: hugh.sampson@mssm.edu

Abstract

There is an impression that children today are experiencing allergic reactions to an increasing variety of foods. We compared two separate groups of children and young adults with atopic dermatitis evaluated a decade apart and found no difference in sensitization rates or overall clinical reactivity to a variety of foods. Allergies to egg, milk, wheat, soy, peanut, tree nuts, and seafood continue to account for ≈ 90% of food-allergic reactions over the past decade.

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