Single-center analysis of early recurrence of nephrotic syndrome following renal transplantation in children

Authors

  • Asher D. Schachter,

    1. Division of Nephrology, Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and the Clinical Investigator Training Program: Harvard/MIT Health Sciences and Technology-Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, in Collaboration with Pfizer Inc., Boston, Massachusetts, USA
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  • William E. Harmon

    1. Division of Nephrology, Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and the Clinical Investigator Training Program: Harvard/MIT Health Sciences and Technology-Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, in Collaboration with Pfizer Inc., Boston, Massachusetts, USA
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Asher D. Schachter, MD, FRCPC, Division of Nephrology, HU-217, Children's Hospital, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA
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E-mail: asher.schachter@tch.harvard.edu

Abstract

Abstract: Recurrence of nephrotic syndrome (NS) after transplantation (Tx) occurs in 20–50% of renal transplant recipients, with a median time to recurrence of 14 days and a 50% rate of graft loss. We performed a retrospective analysis of 22 pediatric patients with NS who received renal transplants at the Children's Hospital, Boston, between 1982 and 1999. During the first 14 days following Tx, 13 (59%) patients developed clinical recurrent nephrotic syndrome (RNS). RNS developed in 50% of living donor recipients and in 70% of cadaveric donor recipients (p= non-significant). Seven of the 13 patients with RNS were treated with plasmapheresis, while six received standard immunosuppressive induction therapy only. Two of the seven treated patients and one of the six untreated patients lost their grafts to RNS, yielding a total RNS graft loss rate of 23%. However, patients with RNS who achieved remission had significantly higher cumulative graft survival at 5 yr than did RNS patients who did not achieve remission (p< 0.001). Overall cumulative graft survival at 5 yr was not significantly different between the two groups: 67% in those with non-recurrent nephrotic syndrome (NRNS) vs. 64% in those with RNS, p= non-significant. We conclude that successful reversal of early RNS improves long-term graft survival in pediatric RNS. Multi-center studies are sorely needed to develop novel, less toxic therapies for native and recurrent NS.

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