Transcranial magnetic stimulation in an amphetamine hyperactivity model of mania

Authors

  • Alona Shaldivin,

    1. Stanley Center for Bipolar Research, Ministry of Health Mental Health Center, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheba, Israel
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  • Alexander Kaptsan,

    1. Stanley Center for Bipolar Research, Ministry of Health Mental Health Center, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheba, Israel
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  • Robert H Belmaker,

    1. Stanley Center for Bipolar Research, Ministry of Health Mental Health Center, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheba, Israel
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  • Haim Einat,

    1. Stanley Center for Bipolar Research, Ministry of Health Mental Health Center, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheba, Israel
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  • Nimrod Grisaru

    1. Stanley Center for Bipolar Research, Ministry of Health Mental Health Center, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheba, Israel
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Corresponding author: Robert H Belmaker, MD, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheba Mental Health Center, PO Box 4600, Beer-Sheba, Israel. Fax: +972 7 640 1621; e-mail: belmaker@bgumail.bgu.ac.il

Abstract

Objectives: Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the brain has been reported to have therapeutic effects in mania, as well as depression. TMS has previously been reported to have effects similar to those of electroconvulsive shock in rat models of depression.

Methods: We, therefore, studied TMS in amphetamine-induced hyperactivity as a rat model of mania.

Results: While two and seven daily TMS sessions significantly reduced activity after amphetamine, twice-daily TMS for 7 days enhanced activity after amphetamine.

Conclusions: The results suggest that TMS treatment to rats interacts with the effects of amphetamine; the specific effects may be dependent on the schedule of treatment.

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