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Cerebral tissue alterations and daily life stress experience in psychosis

Authors

  • M. Marcelis,

    1. Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, azM/Mondriaan/Riagg/RIBW/Vijverdal Academic Centre, European Graduate School of Neuroscience, Maastricht University, the Netherlands;
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  • I. Myin-Germeys,

    1. Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, azM/Mondriaan/Riagg/RIBW/Vijverdal Academic Centre, European Graduate School of Neuroscience, Maastricht University, the Netherlands;
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  • J. Suckling,

    1. Clinical Age Research Unit, Department of Health Care of the Elderly, Guy's King's and St Thomas' Medical School, London and Department of Biostatistics and Computing, The Institute of Psychiatry, London, UK;
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  • P. Woodruff,

    1. Academic Department of Psychiatry, University of Sheffield, Northern General Hospital (The Longley Centre), Norwood Grange road, Sheffield, UK;
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  • P. Hofman,

    1. Department of Radiology, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht, the Netherlands;
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  • E. Bullmore,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambrige, UK;
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  • P. Delespaul,

    1. Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, azM/Mondriaan/Riagg/RIBW/Vijverdal Academic Centre, European Graduate School of Neuroscience, Maastricht University, the Netherlands;
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  • J. Van Os

    1. Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, azM/Mondriaan/Riagg/RIBW/Vijverdal Academic Centre, European Graduate School of Neuroscience, Maastricht University, the Netherlands;
    2. Division of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, London, UK
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Jim van Os, Department Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, Maastricht University, PO Box 616 (DRT 10), 6200 MD, Maastricht, The Netherlands
E-mail: j.vanos@sp.unimaas.nl

Abstract

Objective: To examine whether the total volumes of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), cerebral grey matter and white matter were correlated with the experience of environmental stress in daily life situations.

Method: Twenty-seven patients with psychosis underwent magnetic resonance imaging scanning and a random time-sampling self-assessment technique (Experience Sampling Method) to determine subjective daily life stress experiences. Total cerebral tissue volumes were derived from an automated segmentation procedure.

Results: CSF volume was positively associated with daily life event-related stress (β=0.016, P=0.002), while the association with total white matter was negative (β=−0.013, P=0.005). The effects were independent of each other and of total cerebral volume and other confounders. No large or significant association was found with grey matter volume.

Conclusion: Subjective stress experience in daily life is associated with increased CSF and reduced white matter volumes in patients with psychosis, suggesting functional significance of these cerebral measures.

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