Get access

The use of reduced healing times on ITI® implants with a sandblasted and acid-etched (SLA) surface:

Early results from clinical trials on ITI® SLA implants

Authors

  • David L. Cochran,

    1. Authors' affiliations:David L. Cochran, Department of Periodontics, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, USA.Daniel Buser, Department of Oral Surgery, School of Dental Medicine, Berne, Switzerland.Christian M. ten Bruggenkate, Rynland Hospital, Leiderdorp, the Netherlands.Dieter Weingart, Department of Oral, Maxillo and Facial Plastic Surgery, Klinikum Stuttgart, Katherinenhospital, Stuttgart, Germany.Thomas M. Taylor, School of Dental Medicine, University of Connecticut, Farmington, USA.Jean-Pierre Bernard, Division of Stomatology and Oral Surgery, School of Dental Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland.Françoise Peters, James P. Simpson, Institut Straumann AG, Waldenburg, Switzerland
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Daniel Buser,

    1. Authors' affiliations:David L. Cochran, Department of Periodontics, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, USA.Daniel Buser, Department of Oral Surgery, School of Dental Medicine, Berne, Switzerland.Christian M. ten Bruggenkate, Rynland Hospital, Leiderdorp, the Netherlands.Dieter Weingart, Department of Oral, Maxillo and Facial Plastic Surgery, Klinikum Stuttgart, Katherinenhospital, Stuttgart, Germany.Thomas M. Taylor, School of Dental Medicine, University of Connecticut, Farmington, USA.Jean-Pierre Bernard, Division of Stomatology and Oral Surgery, School of Dental Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland.Françoise Peters, James P. Simpson, Institut Straumann AG, Waldenburg, Switzerland
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Christian M. Ten Bruggenkate,

    1. Authors' affiliations:David L. Cochran, Department of Periodontics, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, USA.Daniel Buser, Department of Oral Surgery, School of Dental Medicine, Berne, Switzerland.Christian M. ten Bruggenkate, Rynland Hospital, Leiderdorp, the Netherlands.Dieter Weingart, Department of Oral, Maxillo and Facial Plastic Surgery, Klinikum Stuttgart, Katherinenhospital, Stuttgart, Germany.Thomas M. Taylor, School of Dental Medicine, University of Connecticut, Farmington, USA.Jean-Pierre Bernard, Division of Stomatology and Oral Surgery, School of Dental Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland.Françoise Peters, James P. Simpson, Institut Straumann AG, Waldenburg, Switzerland
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Dieter Weingart,

    1. Authors' affiliations:David L. Cochran, Department of Periodontics, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, USA.Daniel Buser, Department of Oral Surgery, School of Dental Medicine, Berne, Switzerland.Christian M. ten Bruggenkate, Rynland Hospital, Leiderdorp, the Netherlands.Dieter Weingart, Department of Oral, Maxillo and Facial Plastic Surgery, Klinikum Stuttgart, Katherinenhospital, Stuttgart, Germany.Thomas M. Taylor, School of Dental Medicine, University of Connecticut, Farmington, USA.Jean-Pierre Bernard, Division of Stomatology and Oral Surgery, School of Dental Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland.Françoise Peters, James P. Simpson, Institut Straumann AG, Waldenburg, Switzerland
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Thomas M. Taylor,

    1. Authors' affiliations:David L. Cochran, Department of Periodontics, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, USA.Daniel Buser, Department of Oral Surgery, School of Dental Medicine, Berne, Switzerland.Christian M. ten Bruggenkate, Rynland Hospital, Leiderdorp, the Netherlands.Dieter Weingart, Department of Oral, Maxillo and Facial Plastic Surgery, Klinikum Stuttgart, Katherinenhospital, Stuttgart, Germany.Thomas M. Taylor, School of Dental Medicine, University of Connecticut, Farmington, USA.Jean-Pierre Bernard, Division of Stomatology and Oral Surgery, School of Dental Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland.Françoise Peters, James P. Simpson, Institut Straumann AG, Waldenburg, Switzerland
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jean-Pierre Bernard,

    1. Authors' affiliations:David L. Cochran, Department of Periodontics, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, USA.Daniel Buser, Department of Oral Surgery, School of Dental Medicine, Berne, Switzerland.Christian M. ten Bruggenkate, Rynland Hospital, Leiderdorp, the Netherlands.Dieter Weingart, Department of Oral, Maxillo and Facial Plastic Surgery, Klinikum Stuttgart, Katherinenhospital, Stuttgart, Germany.Thomas M. Taylor, School of Dental Medicine, University of Connecticut, Farmington, USA.Jean-Pierre Bernard, Division of Stomatology and Oral Surgery, School of Dental Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland.Françoise Peters, James P. Simpson, Institut Straumann AG, Waldenburg, Switzerland
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Françoise Peters,

    1. Authors' affiliations:David L. Cochran, Department of Periodontics, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, USA.Daniel Buser, Department of Oral Surgery, School of Dental Medicine, Berne, Switzerland.Christian M. ten Bruggenkate, Rynland Hospital, Leiderdorp, the Netherlands.Dieter Weingart, Department of Oral, Maxillo and Facial Plastic Surgery, Klinikum Stuttgart, Katherinenhospital, Stuttgart, Germany.Thomas M. Taylor, School of Dental Medicine, University of Connecticut, Farmington, USA.Jean-Pierre Bernard, Division of Stomatology and Oral Surgery, School of Dental Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland.Françoise Peters, James P. Simpson, Institut Straumann AG, Waldenburg, Switzerland
    Search for more papers by this author
  • James P. Simpson

    1. Authors' affiliations:David L. Cochran, Department of Periodontics, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, USA.Daniel Buser, Department of Oral Surgery, School of Dental Medicine, Berne, Switzerland.Christian M. ten Bruggenkate, Rynland Hospital, Leiderdorp, the Netherlands.Dieter Weingart, Department of Oral, Maxillo and Facial Plastic Surgery, Klinikum Stuttgart, Katherinenhospital, Stuttgart, Germany.Thomas M. Taylor, School of Dental Medicine, University of Connecticut, Farmington, USA.Jean-Pierre Bernard, Division of Stomatology and Oral Surgery, School of Dental Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland.Françoise Peters, James P. Simpson, Institut Straumann AG, Waldenburg, Switzerland
    Search for more papers by this author


David L. Cochran
Department of Periodontics, MSC 7894
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
7703 Floyd Curl Drive
San Antonio
Texas 78229–3900
USA
Tel: + 1 210 567 3604
Fax: + 1 210 567 3643
e-mail: cochran@uthscsa.edu

Abstract

Summary: ITI® dental implants are available with two bone-anchoring surfaces, a titanium plasma-sprayed (TPS) surface, and a recently introduced sandblasted and acid-etched (SLA) surface. Cell culture and animal tests demonstrate that the SLA surface stimulates bone cell differentiation and protein production, has large amounts of bone-to-implant contact, and results in large removal torque values in functional testing of the bone contact. As a result of these studies, a prospective human clinical trial was initiated to determine whether the 4.1 mm diameter SLA ITI® solid screw implants could be predictably and safely restored as early as six weeks after implant placement surgery. The protocol restricted the use of the reduced healing time to a) healthy patients with sufficient bone volume to surround the implant, and b) those patients who had good bone quality (classes I-III) at the implant recipient site. Patients with poorer bone quality (class IV) did not have restorations until 12 weeks after implant placement. The clinical trial is an ongoing multicenter trial, with six centers in four countries, and with follow-up over five years. The primary outcome variable was abutment placement with a 35 Ncm force, with no countertorque and no pain or rotation of the implant. A secondary outcome was implant success, as defined by no mobility, no persistent pain or infection, and no peri-implant radiolucency. To date, 110 patients with 326 implants have completed the one-year post-loading recall visit, while 47 patients with 138 implants have completed the two-year recall. Three implants were lost prior to abutment connection. Prosthetic restoration was commenced after shortened healing times on 307 implants. The success rate for these implants, as judged by abutment placement, was 99.3% (with an average healing time of 49 days). Life table analyses demonstrated an implant success rate of 99.1%, both for 329 implants at one year and for 138 implants at two years. In the 24-month period after restoration, no implant losses were reported for the 138 implants. These results demonstrate that, under defined conditions, solid screw ITI® implants with an SLA endosseous surface can be restored after approximately six weeks of healing with a high predictability of success, defined by abutment placement at 35 Ncm without countertorque, and with subsequent implant success rates of greater than 99% two years after restoration.

Résumé

Les implants dentaires ?T?® sont disponibles avec deux surfaces d'ancrage à l'os: une surface plasma-spray en titane (TPS) et une surface récomment présentée, soufflée et mordançée (SLA). La culture cellulaire et des tests sur l'animal ont démontré que la surface SLA stimulait la différenciation des cellules osseuses et la production de protéines, qu'elle la différenciation des cellules osseuses et la production de protéines, qu'elle possédait de grandes quantités de contact os-implant et résultait en des valeurs importantes de contre-torsion. Un essai clinique prospectif chez l'être de 4,1 mm en forme de vis pouvaient être utilisés six semaines après la chirurgie. Le protocole restrignait l'utilisation du temps de guérison chez les patients sains avec un volume osseux suffisant pour entourer l'implant et chez des patients qui avaient une bonne qualité osseuse (Types ?-???) au niveau du site receveur de l'implant. Des patients ayant un os de qualité moindre (type ?V) n'avaient des restaurations commencées que douze remaines après l'insertion des implants. L'essai clinique était une recherche multicentrique qui se déroule encore actuellement dans six centres dans quatre pays avec un suivi de cinq années. La première variable a été le placement des piliers avec une force de 35 Ncm sans contre-torsion et douleur ou rotation de l'implant. Une seconde découverte a été le succès de l'implant défini par l'absence de mobilité. L'ábsence de douleur persistante ou d'infection, et aucune radioclareté paro?mplantaire. Jusqu'à présent 110 patients avec 326 implants ont achevé leur visite de rappel d'une année et 47 patients et 138 implantsterminaient leur visite de rappel de deux années. Trois implants ont été perdus avant la connection du pilier. La restauration prothétique a été entreprise après la restiction du temps de guérison sur 307 implants. Les résultats démontrent que la diminution du temps de guérison jugé par les taux de succès au moment du placement du pilier était de 99,3%. Le tempts de guérison moyen pour ces implants était de 49 jours. Les analyses de succès des implants présentaient 329 implants avec un taux de succès d'une année de 99,1% et un taux de succès à deux ans de 99,1% pour 138 implants. Aucune perte implantaire n'a été rapportée après restauration. Sous des conditions définies les implants ?T?® vis solides avec une surface endoosseuse SLA peuvent être restaurés après environ six semaines de guérison avec un taux de prévision important de succès défini par le placement du pilier à 35 Ncm sans contre-torsion et avec des taux de succès implantaires de 99% après deux années d'observation.

Zusammenfassung

Die ?T?®-Zahnimplantate sind mit zwei Oberflächen für den Knochenbereich erhältlich, der Titanplasmasprayschicht (TPS) und der kürzlich eingeführten sandgestrahlten und säuregeätzten Oberfläche (SLA). Untersuchungen mit Zellkulturen und Tieren zeigen, dass SLA-Oberflächen eine Knochenzelldifferenzierung und Proteinproduktion induzieren, eine sehr hohe Knochen-?mplantatkontraktrate haben und in der Folge in funktionellen Tests auch hohe Ausdrehwiderstände zeigen. Auf Grund dieser Resultate regten wir eine prospektive klinische Studie am Menschen an, die mithelfen soll festzustellen, ob SLA ?T?®-Vollschraubeimplantate mit einem Durchmesser von 4.1 mm 6 Wochen nach der chirurgischen ?mplantation voraussagbar und sicher rekonstruiert werden können. Das Protokoll beschränkte die verkürzte Einheilphase auf gesunde Patienten mit genügend Knochenvolumen um die ?mplantate und auf solche, die eine gute Knochenqualität (Typ ?-???) um die ?mplantationsstelle aufwiesen. Patienten mit qualitativ weniger gutem Knochen (Typ ?V) erhielten die Rekonstruktion frühestens nach 12 Wochen. Diese klinische Studie ist eine über 5 Jahre laufende Multizenterstudie an 6 Zentren in vier Ländern. Die erste Frage der Untersuchungen betraf die Fixation des Sekundärteils mit einer Kraft von 35 Ncm. Dabei sollte weder ein Wiederausdrehen des ?mplantates, noch Schmerzen oder Rotationen des ?mplantates vorkommen. Die zweite Frage betrifft den Erfolg der ?mplantation, definiert durch Stabilität, Schmerzfreiheit, ?nfektionsfreiheit und keine Radiotransluzenz um den ?mplantatkörper. Zurzeit stehen 110 Patienten mit 326 ?mplantaten mindestens ein Jahr nach Rekonstruktion und funktioneller Belastung, 47 Patienten oder 138 ?mplatate davon bereits zwei Jahre. Die Resultate zeigen, dass eine reduzierte Heilphase bis zum Tag der Fixation des Sekundärteils eine Erfolgsrate von 99.3% hat. Die durchschnittliche Einheilphase dieser ?mplantate betrug 49 Tage. Der auf Überlevenstabellen analysierte Erfolg zeigte für die 329 ?mplantate eine Erfolgsrate von 99.1% nach einem Jahr und für die 138 ?mplantate eine von 99.1% nach zwei Jahren. Nach 24 Monaten harren wir auf den 138 ?mplantaten keine Rekonstruktionsverluste. Die Resultate zeigen, dass unter definierten Bedingungen ein ?T?®-Vollschraubenimplantat mit einer SLA-Oberfläche nach einer Einheilphase von etwa 6 Wochen mit gut voraussagbaren ERfolgaussichten rekonstruiert werden kann. Dabei wird der Erfolg definiert durch eine Fixation des Sekundärteiles mit 35 Ncm ohne Retentionsverlust und einer anschliessenden Erfolgsrate von über 99% zwei Jahre nach der Rekonstruktion.

Resumen

Los implantes dentales ?T?®-están disponibles en dos superficies de anclaje óseo, una superficie de plasma de titanio pulverizado (TPS), y una superficie recientemente introducida chorreada por arena y grabada con ácido (SLA). Los cultivos celulares y los tests en animales demuestran que la superficie SLA estimula la diferenciación de células óseas y la producción de proteinas, tiene unas amplias zonas de contracto hueso-implante, y, resulta en altos valores de torsque de remoción en los tests funcionales de contacto óseo. Como resultado de estos estudios, se inició un ensayo clínico humano prospectivo para determinar si los implantes roscados macizos de 4.1 mm de diámetro SLA ?T?® podrían ser restaurados con predictibilidad y seguridad tan temprano como a las 6 semanas de la cirugía de colocación del implante. El protocolo restringió el uso del periodo reducido de cicatrización a pacientes sanos con sulficiente volumen de hueso para rodear el implante y aquellos pacientes que tenían una buena calidad de hueso (tipo ?-???) en el lugar receptor del implante. Los pacientes con una peor calidad de hueso (tipo ?V) recibieron las restauraciones tras 12 semanas de la colocación del implante. El ensayo clínico que continúa multicentricamente con 6 centros en 4 países con un seguimiento de 5 años. La primera variable resultante fue la colocación del pilar con una fuerza de 35 Ncm sin contratorque y sin dolor o rotación del implante. La segunda resultante fue el éxito del implante definido por ninguna movilidad, ningún dolor persistente o infección y ninguna radioluscencia periimplantaria. hasta la fecha 110 pacientes con 326 implantes han completado un año de visitas de mantenimiento tras la carga y 47 pacientes con 138 implantes han completado los dos años de mantenimiento. SE perdieron tres implantes antes de la conexión del pilar. La restauración prostética comenzó tras el tiempo reducido de cicatrización en 307 implantes. Los resultatdos demuestran que el tratamiento con tiempo reducido de cicatrización valorado por el índice de éxito de colocación de pilares fue del 93%. La media de tiempo de cicatrización para estros implantes fue de 49 dias. El anáfisis de la tabla de éxito de implantes muestra 329 implantes con un indice de éxito de un año del 99.1% y de dos años del 99.1% para 138 implantes. Estos resultados demuestran que bajo unas condiciones definidas, los implantes rescados macizos ?T?® xon una superficie endoósea SLA pueden ser restaurados después de aproximadamente 6 semanas de cicatrización con una alta predicitibilidad de éxito definida por colocación del pilar con 35 Ncm sin contratorque y con un indice de éxito de implantes subsecuente mayor del 99% a los 2 años tras la restauración.

Ancillary