Changes in actin dynamics at the T-cell/APC interface: implications for T-cell anergy?

Authors

  • Antonio S. Sechi,

    1. 1Department of Cell Biology, Gesellschaft für Biotechnologische Forschung, Braunschweig
      2Institute of Medical Microbiology and
      3Department of Visceral and Transplant Surgery, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Hannover, Germany.
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  • 1 Jan Buer,

    1. 1Department of Cell Biology, Gesellschaft für Biotechnologische Forschung, Braunschweig
      2Institute of Medical Microbiology and
      3Department of Visceral and Transplant Surgery, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Hannover, Germany.
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  • 1,2 Jürgen Wehland,

    1. 1Department of Cell Biology, Gesellschaft für Biotechnologische Forschung, Braunschweig
      2Institute of Medical Microbiology and
      3Department of Visceral and Transplant Surgery, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Hannover, Germany.
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  • and 1 Michael Probst-Kepper 3

    1. 1Department of Cell Biology, Gesellschaft für Biotechnologische Forschung, Braunschweig
      2Institute of Medical Microbiology and
      3Department of Visceral and Transplant Surgery, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Hannover, Germany.
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Jürgen Wehland
Department of Cell Biology
Gesellschaft für Biotechnologische Forschung (GBF)
Mascheroder Weg 1
D-38124 Braunschweig
Germany
Tel.: + 49 531 6181 415
Fax: + 49 531 6181 444
e-mail: jwe@gbf.de

Abstract

Summary: Over the past 20 years the role of the actin cytoskeleton in the formation of the immunological synapse and in T-cell activation has been the subject of intense scrutiny. T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling leads to tyrosine phosphorylation of numerous adapter proteins whose function is to relay signals to downstream components of the TCR signaling pathway and, in particular, to molecules implicated in remodeling the actin cytoskeleton. Here, we discuss how signals from the TCR converge on two key regulators of the actin cytoskeleton, Ena/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoproteins (VASPs) and the actin-related protein (ARP2/3) complex. We also discuss the implications of TCR signaling in the process of T-cell anergy with particular emphasis on the actin remodeling and molecules involved in the control of T-cell proliferation.

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