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    N. F. Bendik, A. G. Gluesenkamp, Body length shrinkage in an endangered amphibian is associated with drought, Journal of Zoology, 2013, 290, 1
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    Peter G. May, Terence M. Farrell, Growth Patterns of Dusky Pygmy Rattlesnakes (Sistrurus miliarius barbouri) from Central Florida, Herpetological Monographs, 2012, 26, 1, 58

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    Christopher T. Winne, John D. Willson, J. Whitfield Gibbons, Drought survival and reproduction impose contrasting selection pressures on maximum body size and sexual size dimorphism in a snake, Seminatrix pygaea, Oecologia, 2010, 162, 4, 913

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    Marshall D. McCue, Snakes survive starvation by employing supply- and demand-side economic strategies, Zoology, 2007, 110, 4, 318

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    Emily N. Taylor, Michael A. Malawy, Dawn M. Browning, Shea V. Lemar, Dale F. DeNardo, Effects of food supplementation on the physiological ecology of female Western diamond-backed rattlesnakes (Crotalus atrox), Oecologia, 2005, 144, 2, 206

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    M. Wikelski, Evolution of body size in Galapagos marine iguanas, Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 2005, 272, 1576, 1985

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    Luca Luiselli, Snakes don't shrink, but ‘shrinkage’ is an almost inevitable outcome of measurement error by the experimenters, Oikos, 2005, 110, 1
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    Luca Luiselli, Snakes don't shrink, but ‘shrinkage’ is an almost inevitable outcome of measurement error by the experimenters, Oikos, 2005, 110, 1
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    Theunis Piersma, Jan Drent, Phenotypic flexibility and the evolution of organismal design, Trends in Ecology & Evolution, 2003, 18, 5, 228

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