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Are wing size, wing shape and asymmetry related to field fitness of Trichogramma egg parasitoids?

Authors

  • Ursula M. Kölliker-Ott,

    1. Kölliker-Ott, U. M., Blows, M. W. and Hoffmann, A. A. 2003. Are wing size, wing shape and asymmetry related to field fitness of Trichogramma egg parasitoids? – Oikos 100: 563–573.
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  • Mark W. Blows,

    1. Kölliker-Ott, U. M., Blows, M. W. and Hoffmann, A. A. 2003. Are wing size, wing shape and asymmetry related to field fitness of Trichogramma egg parasitoids? – Oikos 100: 563–573.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Ary A. Hoffmann

    1. Kölliker-Ott, U. M., Blows, M. W. and Hoffmann, A. A. 2003. Are wing size, wing shape and asymmetry related to field fitness of Trichogramma egg parasitoids? – Oikos 100: 563–573.
    Search for more papers by this author

U. M. Kölliker-Ott and A. A. Hoffmann, Centre for Environmental Stress and Adaptation Research (CESAR), La Trobe Univ., Bundoora, Victoria 3083, Australia (Present address of UMKO: Eidgenössische Forschungsanstalt für Agarökologie und Landbau (FAL), Reckenholzstrasse 191, CH-8046 Zürich, Switzerland [ursula.koelliker@alumni.ethz.ch]). – M. W. Blows, Dept of Zool. and Entomol., Univ. of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia.

Abstract

The effects of wing shape, wing size, and fluctuating asymmetry in these measures on the field fitness of T. nr. brassicae and T. pretiosum were investigated. Trichogramma wasps mass-reared on eggs of the factitious host Sitotroga cerealella were released in tomato paddocks and those females ovipositing on Helicoverpa spp. eggs were recaptured. Comparisons of the recaptured group with a sample from the release population were used to assess fitness. Wing data were obtained by positioning landmarks on mounted forewings. Size was then measured as the centroid size computed from landmark distances, while Procrustes analysis followed by principal component analysis was used to assess wing shape. Similar findings were obtained for both Trichogramma species: fitness of wasps was strongly related to wing size and some shape dimensions, but not to the asymmetries of these measures. Wasps which performed well in the field had larger wings and a different wing shape compared to wasps from the mass reared population. Both size and the shape dimensions were linearly associated with fitness although there was also some evidence for non-linear selection on shape. The results suggest that wing shape and wing size are reliable predictors of field fitness for these Trichogramma wasps.

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