Atmospheric CO2 variations over the last three glacial–interglacial climatic cycles deduced from the Dome Fuji deep ice core, Antarctica using a wet extraction technique

Authors


Corresponding author. Present address: Climate and Environmental Physics, Physics Institute, University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland.
e-mail: kawamura@climate.unibe.ch

abstract

A deep ice core drilled at Dome Fuji, East Antarctica was analyzed for the CO2 concentration using a wet extraction method in order to reconstruct its atmospheric variations over the past 320 kyr, which includes three full glacial–interglacial climatic cycles, with a mean time resolution of about 1.1 kyr. The CO2 concentration values derived for the past 65 kyr are very close to those obtained from other Antarctic ice cores using dry extraction methods, although the wet extraction method is generally thought to be inappropriate for the determination of the CO2 concentration. The comparison between the CO2 and Ca2+ concentrations deduced from the Dome Fuji core suggests that calcium carbonate emitted from lands was mostly neutralized in the atmosphere before reaching the central part of Antarctica, or that only a small part of calcium carbonate was involved in CO2 production during the wet extraction process. The CO2 concentration for the past 320 kyr deduced from the Dome Fuji core varies between 190 and 300 ppmv, showing clear glacial–interglacial variations similar to the result of the Vostok ice core. However, for some periods, the concentration values of the Dome Fuji core are higher by up to 20 ppmv than those of the Vostok core. There is no clear indication that such differences are related to variations of chemical components of Ca2+, microparticle and acidity of the Dome Fuji core.

Ancillary