Predicting Antisocial Behavior Among Latino Young Adolescents: An Ecological Systems Analysis

Authors

  • Mary Keegan Eamon PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    Search for more papers by this author
    • 2

      Mary Keegan Eamon, PhD, and Cray Mulder, MSW, School of Social Work, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

  • Cray Mulder MSW

    1. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    Search for more papers by this author
    • 2

      Mary Keegan Eamon, PhD, and Cray Mulder, MSW, School of Social Work, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.


School of Social Work, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801. E-mail: eamon@uiuc.edu

Abstract

The authors used data from a national sample of 420 Latino young adolescents to examine multiple predictors of antisocial behavior within an ecological systems framework. They found that boys and youths who lived a higher proportion of their life in poverty exhibited higher levels of antisocial behavior, and mothers' acculturation was associated with lower levels. Neighborhood and school environments, exposure to deviant peer pressure, and 3 parenting practices—parent-youth attachment, physical punishment, and mothers' monitoring—were related to Latino youth antisocial behavior. Neighborhood quality and peer pressure explained the relation between poverty and an increased risk for antisocial behavior.

Ancillary