An Empirically Supported and Culturally Specific Engagement and Intervention Strategy for African American Adolescent Males

Authors

  • Howard A. Liddle EdD,

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Miami Miller School of Medicine
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      Howard A. Liddle, EdD, April Jackson-Gilfort, PhD. and Françoise A. Marvel, BA, Center for Treatment Research on Adolescent Drug Abuse, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.

  • April Jackson-Gilfort PhD,

    1. University of Miami Miller School of Medicine
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      Howard A. Liddle, EdD, April Jackson-Gilfort, PhD. and Françoise A. Marvel, BA, Center for Treatment Research on Adolescent Drug Abuse, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.

  • Françoise A. Marvel BA

    1. University of Miami Miller School of Medicine
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      Howard A. Liddle, EdD, April Jackson-Gilfort, PhD. and Françoise A. Marvel, BA, Center for Treatment Research on Adolescent Drug Abuse, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.


  • This research has been supported by a variety of grants from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (H. Liddle, Principal Investigator).

  • The cultural themes content in this article is based on the dissertation research of April Jackson-Gilfort. We gratefully acknowledge Dana Becker and Michael Taylor, who worked on the initial attempts to integrate these themes into the MDFT model, and Rosemarie Rodriguez for her editorial contributions. We also acknowledge the work of the MDFT Treatment Development teams at Temple University and the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.

Center for Treatment Research on Adolescent Drug Abuse, Department of Epidemiology & Public Health, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 1400 N.W. 10th Avenue, Miami, FL 33136. E-mail: hliddle@med.miami.edu

Abstract

The need for effective culturally responsive treatments has become more urgent as the number of ethnic minority clients continues to increase. Previous research with a clinically referred sample of substance-abusing African American inner-city teenagers found that treatment engagement increased when cultural content was incorporated in the therapeutic process (Jackson-Gilfort, Liddle, Tejeda, & Dakof, 2001). This article amplifies these findings by offering clinical guidelines for how to develop and implement culturally specific interventions that contribute to the therapeutic engagement of African American adolescent males. Clinical outcomes may be improved by integrating culturally responsive intervention methods within a multisystemic approach to the adolescent's treatment.

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