POSTPARTUM AFFECT AND DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS IN MOTHERS AND FATHERS

Authors

  • Elizabeth Soliday Ph.D.,

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      A revised version of a paper submitted to the Journal in July 1997. Research was supported in part by U.S. Dept. of Education, Office of Special Education Programs award H024U80001 to the Kansas Early Childhood Research Institute, and by the University of Kansas Graduate School. Authors are at: Washington State University, Vancouver (Soliday); and University of Kansas, Lawrence (McCluskey-Fawcett, O'Brien).

  • Kathleen McCluskey-Fawcett Ph.D.,

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      A revised version of a paper submitted to the Journal in July 1997. Research was supported in part by U.S. Dept. of Education, Office of Special Education Programs award H024U80001 to the Kansas Early Childhood Research Institute, and by the University of Kansas Graduate School. Authors are at: Washington State University, Vancouver (Soliday); and University of Kansas, Lawrence (McCluskey-Fawcett, O'Brien).

  • Marion O'Brien Ph.D.

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      A revised version of a paper submitted to the Journal in July 1997. Research was supported in part by U.S. Dept. of Education, Office of Special Education Programs award H024U80001 to the Kansas Early Childhood Research Institute, and by the University of Kansas Graduate School. Authors are at: Washington State University, Vancouver (Soliday); and University of Kansas, Lawrence (McCluskey-Fawcett, O'Brien).


Psychology and Human Development, Washington State University, 14204 NE Salmon Creek Ave., Vancouver, WA 986867

Abstract

In a study of the postpartum affective experiences of couples, mothers and fathers completed questionnaires on coping, marital satisfaction, stress, positive and negative affect, and depression one month pre- and then one month postpartum. More than one-fourth of both mothers and fathers reported elevated depressive symptoms, which correlated significantly between parents. Prepartum coping, stress, and affect significantly predicted postpartum affect. Research and clinical applications of the findings are discussed.

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