IN THE EYE OF THE BEHOLDER: Risk and Protective Factors in Rural American Indian and Caucasian Adolescents

Authors

  • Philip A. Fisher Ph.D.,

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      Authors are at: Oregon Social Learning Center, Eugene (Fisher); Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle (Storck); and Psychological Services (private practice), Coulee Dam, Wash. (Bacon).

  • Michael Storck M.D.,

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      Authors are at: Oregon Social Learning Center, Eugene (Fisher); Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle (Storck); and Psychological Services (private practice), Coulee Dam, Wash. (Bacon).

  • Jan G. Bacon Ph.D.

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      Authors are at: Oregon Social Learning Center, Eugene (Fisher); Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle (Storck); and Psychological Services (private practice), Coulee Dam, Wash. (Bacon).


  • A revised version of a paper submitted to the Journal in April 1998. Research was supported by grant ISR000722-03 ISR73 from the Indian Health Service to the third author, and grants P30MH46690 and R01MH37911 from the National Institute of Mental Health, and HD19739 from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, to the first author.

Oregon Social Learning Center, 160 East 4th Avenue, Eugene, OR 97401-2426 [e-mail: philf@oslc.org]

Abstract

This study examines how relations between risk and protective factors and psychopathology vary by ethnic group, gender, and informant. Data were collected from Caucasian and American Indian adolescents, and their teachers. Results indicate a need for interventions that reduce risk, increase protective factors, and bring about greater convergence in the perceptions of teachers and youth.

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