Physiology and pharmacology of alcohol: the imidazobenzodiazepine alcohol antagonist site on subtypes of GABAA receptors as an opportunity for drug development?

Authors

  • M Wallner,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA
      Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, University of California, Room 23-120 CHS, Charles Young Drive South, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1735, USA. E-mail: mwallner@mednet.ucla.edu
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  • R W Olsen

    1. Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA
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Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, University of California, Room 23-120 CHS, Charles Young Drive South, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1735, USA. E-mail: mwallner@mednet.ucla.edu

Abstract

Alcohol (ethanol, EtOH) has pleiotropic actions and induces a number of acute and long-term effects due to direct actions on alcohol targets, and effects of alcohol metabolites and metabolism. Many detrimental health consequences are due to EtOH metabolism and metabolites, in particular acetaldehyde, whose high reactivity leads to nonspecific chemical modifications of proteins and nucleic acids. Like acetaldehyde, alcohol has been widely considered a nonspecific drug, despite rather persuasive evidence implicating inhibitory GABAA receptors (GABAARs) in acute alcohol actions, for example, a GABAAR ligand, the imidazobenzodiazepine Ro15-4513 antagonizes many low-to-moderate dose alcohol actions in mammals. It was therefore rather surprising that abundant types of synaptic GABAARs are generally not responsive to relevant low concentrations of EtOH. In contrast, δ-subunit-containing GABAARs and extrasynaptic tonic GABA currents mediated by these receptors are sensitive to alcohol concentrations that are reached in blood and tissues during low-to-moderate alcohol consumption. We recently showed that low-dose alcohol enhancement on highly alcohol-sensitive GABAAR subtypes is antagonized by Ro15-4513 in an apparently competitive manner, providing a molecular explanation for behavioural Ro15-4513 alcohol antagonism. The identification of a Ro15-4513/EtOH binding site on unique GABAAR subtypes opens the possibility to characterize this alcohol site(s) and screen for compounds that modulate the function of EtOH/Ro15-4513-sensitive GABAARs. The utility of such drugs might range from novel alcohol antagonists that might be useful in the emergency room, to drugs for the treatment of alcoholism, as well as alcohol-mimetic drugs to harness acute positive effects of alcohol.

British Journal of Pharmacology (2008) 154, 288–298; doi:10.1038/bjp.2008.32; published online 18 February 2008

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