Disability, Arthritis, and Body Weight among Adults 45 Years and Older

Authors

  • Catherine A. Okoro,

    1. National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
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  • Jennifer M. Hootman,

    1. National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
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  • Tara W. Strine,

    1. National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
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  • Lina S. Balluz,

    1. National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
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  • Ali H. Mokdad

    Corresponding author
    1. National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
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  • The costs of publication of this article were defrayed, in part, by the payment of page charges. This article must, therefore, be hereby marked “advertisement” in accordance with 18 U.S.C. Section 1734 solely to indicate this fact.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, NE, Mailstop K66, Atlanta, GA 30341. E-mail: Cokoro@cdc.gov

Abstract

Objectives: To examine the association between body weight and disability among persons with and without self-reported arthritis.

Research Methods and Procedures: Data were analyzed for noninstitutionalized adults, 45 years or older, in states that participated in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Self-reported BMI (kilograms per meter squared) was used to categorize participants into six BMI-defined groups: underweight (<18.5), normal weight (18.5 to <25), overweight (25 to <30), obese, class 1 (30 to <35), obese, class 2 (35 to <40), and obese, class 3 (≥40).

Results: Class 3 obesity (BMI ≥ 40) was significantly associated with disability among participants both with and without self-reported arthritis. The adjusted odds ratio (AOR) for disability in participants with class 3 obesity was 2.75 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.22 to 3.40] among those with self-reported arthritis and 1.77 (95% CI = 1.20 to 2.62) among those without self-reported arthritis compared with those of normal weight (BMI 18.5 to <25). Persons with self-reported arthritis who were obese, class 2 (BMI 35 to <40) and obese, class 1 (BMI 30 to <35) and women with self-reported arthritis who were overweight (BMI 25 to <30) also had higher odds of disability compared with those of normal weight [AOR = 1.72 (95% CI = 1.47 to 2.00), AOR = 1.30 (95% CI = 1.17 to 1.44), and AOR = 1.18 (95% CI = 1.06 to 1.32), respectively].

Discussion: Our findings reveal that obesity is associated with disability. Preventing and controlling obesity may improve the quality of life for persons with and without self-reported arthritis.

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