Efficacy of Lifestyle Modification for Long-Term Weight Control

Authors

  • Thomas A. Wadden PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
      University of Pennsylvania, 3535 Market Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104. E-mail: Wadden@mail.med.upenn.edu
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  • Meghan L. Butryn,

    1. Drexel University, Department of Psychology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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  • Kirstin J. Byrne

    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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University of Pennsylvania, 3535 Market Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104. E-mail: Wadden@mail.med.upenn.edu

Abstract

A comprehensive program of lifestyle modification induces loss of ∼10% of initial weight in 16 to 26 weeks, as revealed by a review of recent randomized controlled trials, including the Diabetes Prevention Program. Long-term weight control is facilitated by continued patient-therapist contact, whether provided in person or by telephone, mail, or e-mail. High levels of physical activity and the consumption of low-calorie, portion-controlled meals, including liquid meal replacements, can also help maintain weight loss. Additional studies are needed of the effects of macronutrient content (e.g., low-fat vs. low-carbohydrate diets) on long-term changes in weight and health. Research also is needed on effective methods of providing comprehensive weight loss control to the millions of Americans who need it.

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