Patient Characteristics as Predictors of Weight Loss after an Obesity Treatment for Children

Authors

  • Caroline Braet

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Developmental, Personality, and Social Psychology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
      Department of Developmental, Personality, and Social Psychology, H. Dunantlaan 2, 9000 Ghent, Belgium. E-mail: caroline.braet@ugent.be
    Search for more papers by this author

  • The costs of publication of this article were defrayed, in part, by the payment of page charges. This article must, therefore, be hereby marked “advertisement” in accordance with 18 U.S.C. Section 1734 solely to indicate this fact.

Department of Developmental, Personality, and Social Psychology, H. Dunantlaan 2, 9000 Ghent, Belgium. E-mail: caroline.braet@ugent.be

Abstract

Objective: To examine pretreatment patient characteristics as predictors of treatment outcome 2 years after completion of an inpatient treatment for children with obesity.

Research Methods and Procedures: Children (N = 122) ranging in age from 7 to 17 years [mean, 12.7 ± 2.3 (SD) years] with a mean adjusted BMI of 179.5 ± 28.6% participated in an inpatient obesity treatment program. Children (90.2% response rate) participated in the 2-year follow-up. Eight predictors, administered at baseline, were entered in separate regression analyses, with weight loss and changes on three psychological health measures as the outcome measures.

Results: Analyses revealed that baseline degree of overweight, age, and initial weight loss were significant positive predictors of weight loss 2 years after treatment, whereas eating disorder characteristics were a negative predictor. Sex, socioeconomic status, global self-esteem, and symptoms of psychopathology did not predict weight loss. With regard to the psychological outcome measures, baseline symptomatology emerged as the most important predictor of treatment changes.

Discussion: Long-lasting weight loss is associated with severity of pretreatment characteristics. Identification of the clinical markers for long-term response to treatment is useful to set realistic weight loss goals for clients and to tailor treatment programs to patient characteristics.

Ancillary