Postprandial Cytokine Concentrations and Meal Composition in Obese and Lean Women

Authors


(wayne.sutherland@stonebow.otago.ac.nz)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to compare the acute effect of (i) meals rich in saturated fat, oleic acid, and α-linolenic acid and (ii) meals rich in starch and fiber on markers of inflammation and oxidative stress in obese and lean women. In a crossover study, 15 abdominally obese women (age, 54 ± 9 years; BMI, 37.3 ± 5.5 kg/m2) and 14 lean women (age, 53 ± 10 years; BMI, 22.9 ± 1.9 kg/m2) consumed meals rich in cream (CR), olive oil (OL), canola oil (CAN), potato (POT), and All-Bran (BRAN) in random order. Blood samples were collected before and up to 6 h after the meals and plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), lipid peroxides (LPOs), free-fatty acids (FFAs), insulin, glucose, and cortisol were measured. Plasma IL-6 decreased significantly 1 h after the meals then increased significantly above baseline at 4 h and 6 h in obese women and at 6 h in lean women. The incremental area under the curve (iAUC) for IL-6 was significantly (P = 0.02) higher in obese compared with lean women and was significantly lower following the high fiber BRAN meal compared with a POT meal (P = 0.003). Waist circumference (R = 0.491, P = 0.007) and cortisol AUC (R = −0.415, P = 0.03) were significant determinants of the magnitude of 6 h changes in plasma IL-6 after the meals. These findings suggest that the postprandial response of plasma IL-6 concentrations may be influenced by the type of carbohydrate in the meal, central adiposity, and circulating cortisol concentrations in women.

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