Effect of a Cellulose-containing Weight-loss Supplement on Gastric Emptying and Sensory Functions

Authors

  • Heiner K. Berthold,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Institute for Clinical Research, Center for Cardiovascular Diseases, Rotenburg an der Fulda, Germany
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  • Susanne Unverdorben,

    1. Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Institute for Clinical Research, Center for Cardiovascular Diseases, Rotenburg an der Fulda, Germany
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  • Ralf Degenhardt,

    1. Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Institute for Clinical Research, Center for Cardiovascular Diseases, Rotenburg an der Fulda, Germany
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  • Martin Unverdorben,

    1. Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Institute for Clinical Research, Center for Cardiovascular Diseases, Rotenburg an der Fulda, Germany
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  • Ioanna Gouni-Berthold

    1. Department of Internal Medicine II, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany
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(berthold@uni-bonn.de)

Abstract

CM3, a highly cross-linked cellulose in capsule form, expands in the stomach to a size several fold of its original volume. It is purported to induce a prolonged feeling of satiation and a delay in gastric emptying, thus promoting weight loss. We examined whether CM3 delays gastric emptying (using the stable isotope 13C-octanoic breath test) and whether it influences subjective feelings of appetite sensations (using visual analog scales, VASs). We performed a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled crossover trial in 19 moderately obese but otherwise healthy subjects (mean age 55 ± 9 years, BMI 31.1 ± 4.6 kg/m2). The subjects were treated with six capsules of CM3 or matching placebo 30 min before a standardized solid meal. Breath collection and VASs were performed over 4 h every 15 min and 30 min, respectively. Half-excretion time of 13CO2 in breath, indicating gastric emptying half time, was the primary outcome parameter. The study was powered to detect a change in gastric emptying of 20–30 min. Mean 13CO2 half-excretion time changed from 2.3 ± 0.4 to 2.4 ± 0.33 h (mean difference +6 min, 95% confidence interval (CI) −3 to +15 min; P = 0.17). Appetite sensations (hunger, satiation, fullness, prospective food consumption, desire to eat something sweet, salty, savory, or fatty) changed over time during the course of the postprandial phase but were not influenced by CM3 (repeated measures ANOVA). In obese subjects, acute administration of the weight-loss supplement CM3 does not delay gastric emptying and does not influence subjective appetite sensations.

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