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Combination of sugar and fat key to animal model of bingeing

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  2. Combination of sugar and fat key to animal model of bingeing
  3. Food stamp participants are more likely to misperceive body weight
  4. Lost dollars and workdays—obesity with cardiometabolic disease costs US more

Animal models of binge eating on either sweet or fatty foods have failed to demonstrate body weight dysregulation. In a more clinically relevant model that patterns human binge-eating behavior, Berner et al. demonstrate that rats bingeing during restricted access to a combined sweet-fat chow exhibit weight fluctuation. The study provides a closer experimental model of voluntary binge-eating behavior in humans. Rats provided with intermittent access to a high-sweet-fat chow binged on this food while self-restricting their intake of a freely available standard chow. Weight gain followed restricted access to the sweet-fat chow. Although between-binge self-restriction decreased body weight, overall weight increased in rats with daily restricted access to the sweet-fat chow. Compared with rats given unrestricted access to the sweet-fat chow, rats with daily restricted access to this food also gained more weight. These results show the utility of a combined sweet-fat diet in modeling binge-eating behavior. Additional studies using this animal model of binge eating could help to better characterize the physiology of this common eating disorder. See page 1998

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Food stamp participants are more likely to misperceive body weight

  1. Top of page
  2. Combination of sugar and fat key to animal model of bingeing
  3. Food stamp participants are more likely to misperceive body weight
  4. Lost dollars and workdays—obesity with cardiometabolic disease costs US more

Obesity is a growing problem among the poor; among some food stamp recipients, especially women, there is a high prevalence of obesity and overweight. New research suggests that women who receive food stamps are more likely to misclassify their weight status. Looking for trends in body weight misperception, the study analyzed NHANES survey data on sociodemographic parameters, BMI measurements, and subjects' self-reported status as underweight, overweight, or of healthy weight. Compared with women who were nonparticipants, overweight food stamp-eligible women in the program were more likely to underestimate their weight classification. Misperception of body weight may be influenced by an individual's peer group in concert with racial, educational, and economic factors. Measures to adapt the food stamp nutrition education program to raise awareness about healthy weight levels could thus work toward promoting a healthier lifestyle among program participants by helping them recognize and address weight issues. See page 2120

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Lost dollars and workdays—obesity with cardiometabolic disease costs US more

  1. Top of page
  2. Combination of sugar and fat key to animal model of bingeing
  3. Food stamp participants are more likely to misperceive body weight
  4. Lost dollars and workdays—obesity with cardiometabolic disease costs US more

A new study by Patrick Sullivan and colleagues assesses the economic burden of the obesity epidemic in light of other cardiometabolic risk factors. Evaluating data from the 2000 and 2002 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, they report on the combined effect of obesity and various cardiometabolic conditions on medical expenses and productivity. Obesity was found to exacerbate the existing economic burden of diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. Compared with normal-weight individuals with these conditions, those who were overweight missed even more workdays and expended up to several thousand dollars more on medical care. As the incidence of obesity and various cardiometabolic conditions increases, the economic ramifications of these conditions for individuals, employers, and health-care providers are expected to grow. See page 2155

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