Excessive Energy Intake Does Not Modify Fed-state Tissue Protein Synthesis Rates in Adult Rats

Authors

  • Solange Adéchian,

    1. INRA, UMR 1019 Nutrition Humaine, Saint Genès Champanelle, France
    2. Univ Clermont 1, UFR Médecine, UMR 1019 Nutrition Humaine, Clermont-Ferrand, France
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  • Silvana Giardina,

    1. Univ Pavia, Department of Physiological and Pharmacological Sciences, Pharmacology and Pharmacological Biotechnology, Pavia, Italy
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  • Didier Rémond,

    1. INRA, UMR 1019 Nutrition Humaine, Saint Genès Champanelle, France
    2. Univ Clermont 1, UFR Médecine, UMR 1019 Nutrition Humaine, Clermont-Ferrand, France
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  • Isabelle Papet,

    1. INRA, UMR 1019 Nutrition Humaine, Saint Genès Champanelle, France
    2. Univ Clermont 1, UFR Médecine, UMR 1019 Nutrition Humaine, Clermont-Ferrand, France
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  • Daniela Buonocore,

    1. Univ Pavia, Department of Physiological and Pharmacological Sciences, Pharmacology and Pharmacological Biotechnology, Pavia, Italy
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  • Claire Gaudichon,

    1. INRA, UMR0914, UMR INRA/INA-PG/AgroParisTech: Physiologie de la Nutrition et du Comportement Alimentaire, Alimentation Humaine, Centre de recherche de Paris, FRA INRA and AgroParisTech, Paris, France
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  • Dominique Dardevet,

    1. INRA, UMR 1019 Nutrition Humaine, Saint Genès Champanelle, France
    2. Univ Clermont 1, UFR Médecine, UMR 1019 Nutrition Humaine, Clermont-Ferrand, France
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  • Fulvio Marzatico,

    1. Univ Pavia, Department of Physiological and Pharmacological Sciences, Pharmacology and Pharmacological Biotechnology, Pavia, Italy
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  • Laurent Mosoni

    Corresponding author
    1. INRA, UMR 1019 Nutrition Humaine, Saint Genès Champanelle, France
    2. Univ Clermont 1, UFR Médecine, UMR 1019 Nutrition Humaine, Clermont-Ferrand, France
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(mosoni@clermont.inra.fr)

Abstract

The impact of chronic excessive energy intake on protein metabolism is still controversial. Male Wistar rats were fed ad libitum during 5 weeks with either a high-fat high-sucrose diet (HF: n = 9) containing 45% of total energy as lipids (protein 14%; carbohydrate 40% with 83.5% sucrose) or a standard diet (controls: n = 10). Energy intake and body weight were recorded. At the end of the experiment, we measured body composition, metabolic parameters (plasma amino acid, lipid, insulin, and glucose levels), inflammatory parameter (plasma α2-macroglobulin), oxidative stress parameters (antioxidant enzyme activities, lipoperoxidation (LPO), protein carbonyl content in liver and muscle), and in vivo fed–state fractional protein synthesis rates (FSRs) in muscle and liver. Energy intake was significantly higher in HF compared with control rats (+28%). There were significant increases in body weight (+8%), body fat (+21%), renal (+41%), and epidydimal (+28%) fat pads in HF compared with control rats. No effect was observed in other tissue weights (liver, muscle, spleen, kidneys, intestine). Liver and muscle FSRs, plasma levels of lipids, glucose, insulin and α2-macroglobulin, soleus and liver glutathione reductase and peroxidase acitivities, MnSOD activity, LPO, and protein carbonyl content were not altered by the HF diet. Only soleus muscle and liver Cu/ZnSOD activity and soleus muscle catalase activities were reduced in HF rats compared with control rats. Thus, chronic excessive energy intake and increased adiposity, in the absence of other metabolic alterations, do not stimulate fed-state tissue protein synthesis rates.

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