Ski Overexpression in Skeletal Muscle Modulates Genetic Programs That Control Susceptibility to Diet-Induced Obesity and Insulin Signaling

Authors

  • Marianne Diaz,

    1. The University of Queensland, Obesity Research Centre, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, Queensland, Australia
    2. Department of Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, Mater Children's Hospital, South Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
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  • Nick Martel,

    1. The University of Queensland, Obesity Research Centre, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, Queensland, Australia
    2. Department of Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, Mater Children's Hospital, South Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
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  • Rebecca L. Fitzsimmons,

    1. The University of Queensland, Obesity Research Centre, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, Queensland, Australia
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  • Natalie A. Eriksson,

    1. The University of Queensland, Obesity Research Centre, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, Queensland, Australia
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  • Gary J. Cowin,

    1. The University of Queensland, Centre for Advanced Imaging, Queensland, Australia
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  • Gethin P. Thomas,

    1. The University of Queensland, Diamantina Institute, Woolloongabba, Australia
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  • Kim-Anh Lê Cao,

    1. The University of Queensland, Queensland Facility for Advanced Bioinformatics, Queensland, Australia
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  • George E.O. Muscat,

    1. The University of Queensland, Obesity Research Centre, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, Queensland, Australia
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  • Gary M. Leong

    Corresponding author
    1. The University of Queensland, Obesity Research Centre, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, Queensland, Australia
    2. Department of Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, Mater Children's Hospital, South Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
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(g.leong@uq.edu.au)

Abstract

Transgenic mice overexpressing chicken Ski (c-Ski) have marked decrease in adipose mass with skeletal muscle hypertrophy. Recent evidence indicates a role for c-Ski in lipogenesis and energy expenditure. In the present study, wild type (WT) and c-Ski mice were challenged on a high-fat (HF) diet to determine whether c-Ski mice were resistant to diet-induced obesity. During the HF feeding WT mice gained significantly more weight than chow-fed animals, while c-Ski mice were partially resistant to the effects of the HF diet on weight. Body composition analysis confirmed the decreased adipose mass in c-Ski mice compared to WT mice. c-Ski mice possess a similar metabolic rate and level of food consumption to WT littermates, despite lower activity levels and on chow diet show mild glucose intolerance relative to WT littermates. On HF diet, glucose tolerance surprisingly remained unchanged in c-Ski mice, while it became worse in WT mice. Skeletal muscle of c-Ski mice exhibit impaired insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and glucose uptake. In concordance, gene expression profiling of skeletal muscle of chow and HF-fed mice indicated that Ski suppresses gene expression associated with insulin signaling and glucose uptake and alters gene pathways involved in myogenesis and adipogenesis. In conclusion, c-Ski mice are partially resistant to diet-induced obesity and display aberrant insulin signaling and glucose homeostasis which is associated with alterations in gene expression that inhibit lipogenesis and insulin signaling. These results suggest Ski plays a major role in skeletal muscle metabolism and adipogenesis and hence influences risk of obesity and diabetes.

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