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Sexual dysfunction and obesity

  1. Top of page
  2. Sexual dysfunction and obesity
  3. Metabolism effects of increased-protein diets
  4. Measuring esophageal pressures in obesity
  5. Health-care costs of severe obesity

inline image Ronette Kolotkin and colleagues update an earlier review examining the effect of obesity on quality of life as related to sexual behavior. To achieve broader coverage of the topic, they analyzed 47 studies, including investigations of obesity-related comorbidities and of female sexual dysfunction. The data suggest a link between obesity and impaired sexual functioning—in particular, erectile dysfunction in men. Interpretation across studies is made difficult by a lack of standardized assessment methods. The authors suggest that future studies investigate the difference between genders and the types and degrees of sexual difficulties. See page 2325

Metabolism effects of increased-protein diets

  1. Top of page
  2. Sexual dysfunction and obesity
  3. Metabolism effects of increased-protein diets
  4. Measuring esophageal pressures in obesity
  5. Health-care costs of severe obesity

inline image The macronutrient composition of food alters the rate at which oxygen is consumed, leading to the idea that targeting a specific diet composition could aid weight loss. Lilian de Jonge and team used data from the Prevention of Obesity Using Novel Dietary Strategies (POUNDS) LOST study, a two-year trial of 811 overweight patients, to test the theory that diets with increased protein may lead to greater energy expenditure and satiety. Patients were assigned to one of four diets: high or low in protein or high or low in carbohydrates. Over the course of the study, both body weight and energy expenditure decreased, but the change was not associated with diet composition. Adaptive thermogenesis was evident at 6 months but was no longer present by 24 months. See page 2384

Measuring esophageal pressures in obesity

  1. Top of page
  2. Sexual dysfunction and obesity
  3. Metabolism effects of increased-protein diets
  4. Measuring esophageal pressures in obesity
  5. Health-care costs of severe obesity

inline image In treating patients in need of a mechanical ventilator, knowing the pleural pressure can help minimize accidental lung injury. Since direct measurement of pleural pressure is not viable, Robert Owens and colleagues investigated an estimation approach that uses esophageal manometry to obtain esophageal pressure. Their study focused on the effect of body position on esophageal pressure. The authors conducted esophageal manometry on 25 overweight or obese subjects and 11 normal-weight control subjects, while the participants were sitting and lying down. The esophageal pressure was higher in the overweight/obese group, but the change in pressure between the two positions was similar. This indicates that esophageal manometry is a valid tool for clinical use. See page 2354

Health-care costs of severe obesity

  1. Top of page
  2. Sexual dysfunction and obesity
  3. Metabolism effects of increased-protein diets
  4. Measuring esophageal pressures in obesity
  5. Health-care costs of severe obesity

inline image Obesity and obesity-related comorbidities are associated with high health-care costs. Catherine Keating compared health-care use and its costs in Australia for a group of 11,769 severely obese individuals before undergoing laparoscopic gastric banding surgery with those for a 140,000-person sample of the general population. The authors found that annual health-care services and prescriptions for the severely obese were $1,735 per year, more than double the costs for the general population, after adjusting for age and sex. The costs were primarily for treatment of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, obstructive airway disease, and depression. See page 2412