The synthetic cannabinoid WIN55,212-2 attenuates hyperalgesia and allodynia in a rat model of neuropathic pain

Authors

  • Daniel Bridges,

    1. Pain Research, Imperial College School of Medicine, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital Campus, London, SW10 9NH
    2. Novartis Institute for Medical Sciences, 5 Gower Place, London, WC1
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  • Kamran Ahmad,

    1. Pain Research, Imperial College School of Medicine, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital Campus, London, SW10 9NH
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  • Andrew S C Rice

    Corresponding author
    1. Pain Research, Imperial College School of Medicine, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital Campus, London, SW10 9NH
      Department of Anaesthetics, Imperial College School of Medicine, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital Campus, 369 Fulham Road, London SW10 9NH. E-mail: a.rice@ic.ac.uk
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Department of Anaesthetics, Imperial College School of Medicine, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital Campus, 369 Fulham Road, London SW10 9NH. E-mail: a.rice@ic.ac.uk

Abstract

  • The analgesic properties of the synthetic cannabinoid WIN55,212-2 were investigated in a model of neuropathic pain. In male Wistar rats, bilateral hind limb withdrawal thresholds to cold, mechanical and noxious thermal stimuli were measured. Following this, unilateral L5 spinal nerve ligation was performed. Seven days later, sensory thresholds were reassessed and the development of allodynia to cold and mechanical stimuli and hyperalgesia to a noxious thermal stimulus confirmed.

  • The effect of WIN55,212-2 (0.1 – 5.0 mg kg−1, i.p.) on the signs of neuropathy was then determined; there was a dose related reversal of all three signs of painful neuropathy at doses which did not generally alter sensory thresholds in the contralateral unligated limb. This effect was prevented by co-administration of the CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716a, but not by co-administration of the CB2 receptor antagonist SR144528, suggesting this action of WIN55,212-2 is mediated via the CB1 receptor. Administration of SR141716a alone had no affect on the observed allodynia and hyperalgesia, which does not support the concept of an endogenous analgesic tone.

  • These data indicate that cannabinoids may have therapeutic potential in neuropathic pain, and that this effect is mediated through the CB1 receptor.

British Journal of Pharmacology (2001) 133, 586–594; doi:10.1038/sj.bjp.0704110

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