Cannabidiol inhibits human glioma cell migration through a cannabinoid receptor-independent mechanism

Authors

  • Angelo Vaccani,

    1. Department of Structural and Functional Biology, Pharmacology Section, Center of Neurosciences, University of Insubria, via A. da Giussano 10, Busto Arsizio (VA) 21052, Italy
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  • Paola Massi,

    1. Department of Pharmacology, Chemotherapy and Medical Toxicology, University of Milan, via Vanvitelli 32, Milan 20129, Italy
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  • Arianna Colombo,

    1. Department of Structural and Functional Biology, Pharmacology Section, Center of Neurosciences, University of Insubria, via A. da Giussano 10, Busto Arsizio (VA) 21052, Italy
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  • Tiziana Rubino,

    1. Department of Structural and Functional Biology, Pharmacology Section, Center of Neurosciences, University of Insubria, via A. da Giussano 10, Busto Arsizio (VA) 21052, Italy
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  • Daniela Parolaro

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Structural and Functional Biology, Pharmacology Section, Center of Neurosciences, University of Insubria, via A. da Giussano 10, Busto Arsizio (VA) 21052, Italy
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Department of Structural and Functional Biology, Pharmacology Section, Center of Neurosciences, University of Insubria, via A. da Giussano 10, Busto Arsizio (VA) 21052, Italy. E-mail: daniela.parolaro@uninsubria.it

Abstract

We evaluated the ability of cannabidiol (CBD) to impair the migration of tumor cells stimulated by conditioned medium. CBD caused concentration-dependent inhibition of the migration of U87 glioma cells, quantified in a Boyden chamber. Since these cells express both cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors in the membrane, we also evaluated their engagement in the antimigratory effect of CBD. The inhibition of cell was not antagonized either by the selective cannabinoid receptor antagonists SR141716 (CB1) and SR144528 (CB2) or by pretreatment with pertussis toxin, indicating no involvement of classical cannabinoid receptors and/or receptors coupled to Gi/o proteins. These results reinforce the evidence of antitumoral properties of CBD, demonstrating its ability to limit tumor invasion, although the mechanism of its pharmacological effects remains to be clarified.

British Journal of Pharmacology (2005) 144, 1032–1036. doi:10.1038/sj.bjp.0706134

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